Monday, July 31, 2017

THE DAY THE SUN DISAPPEARS !

THE DAY THE SUN DISAPPEARS!




CNN
By Judson Jones, CNN ·
Updated 9:50 AM EDT July 31, 2017
For complete coverage of the Eclipse of the Century go to cnn.com/eclipse. Watch live, in virtual reality, as the eclipse moves coast to coast on August 21st.
In less than a month, the sun will disappear -- for a short time -- across America.
For a brief moment, day will turn to night. Animals big and small will go into their nighttime routines. Stars and planets will be visible, and streetlights will turn on in the middle of the day.
Here are some of the things you should know about the total solar eclipse happening August 21.

Don't miss it! This is rare, says NASA

"The hair on the back of your neck is going to stand up, and you are going to feel different things as the eclipse reaches totality. It's been described as peaceful, spiritual, exhilarating, shocking," said Brian Carlstrom, deputy associate director of the National Park Service Natural Resource Stewardship and Science Directorate.
According to NASA, experiencing a total solar eclipse where you live happens about once in 375 years. So, unless modern medicine advances considerably in the next few years, you might not make it to the next one.
The last time anyone in the United States witnessed a solar eclipse was almost 40 years ago, on February 26, 1979. It's been even longer -- 99 years -- since a total solar eclipse crossed the country from the Pacific to the Atlantic. The total eclipse on June 8, 1918, passed from Washington to Florida.
You can set your clock to it, even to the precise second.
Make your plans now. If you are reading this at work and want to ask for the day off, you will soon find that all of your science geek colleagues have already asked off for this random Monday in August. If you can't manage to convey to your boss that no one else will be doing business and you can't get the day off, block out your calendar for an outdoor meeting or a long lunch
Even if you live in New York, Los Angeles, Houston, Chicago or Atlanta, you will go slightly dark. In fact, all of North America will be able to see a partial eclipse.



Do you have to be in 'totality'?

To see "totality," in which the moon completely blocks the sun, you will need to be inside the narrow swath -- about 70 miles wide -- of the moon's shadow. The path will stretch from the Oregon coast to the South Carolina coast, with 12 states in between.
Nearly 12.2 million Americans live in the path of totality, but NASA predicts that millions more will visit it that day. "About 200 million people (a little less than 2⁄3 the nation's population) live within one day's drive of the path of this total eclipse," the agency said.
"This will be like Woodstock 200 times over -- but across the whole country," said Alex Young, solar scientist at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center.
The Federal Highway Administration is calling this a "planned special event for which there has been no recent precedent in the United States."
It expects heavy traffic before and after the eclipse along the path of totality. The agency suggests getting to your chosen spot hours before, if not the day before. The one thing you don't want to do is come up short of totality.
"This is one of those rare events where being close is not good enough," said J. Kelly Beatty, senior editor of Sky & Telescope. "A sun that's 99% covered is vastly different than the one that's 100% covered. Like I say to people, it's like being on a first date versus being on your wedding night."
Most astronomers have the same advice: Get to the path of totality, because you won't want to miss this.
"I know it's a Monday and for some parts of the country a school day, and it may be inconvenient or cost more than you want, but it really should be a priority," said David Baron, author of the book "American Eclipse." "The general impression is, if you live somewhere with a 90% partial eclipse, that's good enough. Absolutely not. It's only during a total solar eclipse that you can take off your eclipse glasses, look up where the sun should be with your naked eye and see a sky you've never seen before."

A fast-moving shadow

During a total solar eclipse, the moon and the sun both appear to be about the same size from the ground. According to NASA, this is a "celestial coincidence," as the sun is about 400 times wider than the moon and about 400 times farther away.
Then, it is just basic geometry. When the Earth, moon and sun line up just right, the moon blocks the sun's entire surface, creating the total eclipse.

Photographers:  Please be aware that you could damage your camera:

Whereas lunar eclipses are safe to view with the naked eye, solar eclipses are not. You must take the necessary precautions to keep from harming your eyesight. In fact, you also need to use a “solar filter” to keep from harming your camera’s imaging sensor as well as for correct exposure.
A solar eclipse occurs whenever the moon’s shadow falls on Earth. This can only occur during a new moon, when the moon passes between the sun and Earth. There are two or more solar eclipses a year; which occur when the geometry lines up just right, so that part of the moon’s shadow falls on Earth’s surface and an eclipse of the sun is seen from that region.

Solar Filters

When viewing or photographing the partial phases of a solar eclipse or the maximum phase of an annular eclipse, you must use a solar filter. Even if 99% of the sun is covered by the moon, the remaining 1% crescent is dangerous to view with the naked eye and can cause serious eye damage or blindness.
You can find information on solar filters and where to purchase them from astronomy websites and magazines. Safe solar filters for cameras and telescopes are available as either "Full-Aperture" and "Off-Axis" filters. Both of these filters fit over the objective (front end of the telescope) or camera lens.
Full-aperture solar filters are the preferred filters of choice. This is because the filter completely covers the front of the telescope so the entire mirror or lens is used. No refocusing of the telescope or camera lens will be needed when you remove the filter at the beginning of totality or when it is replaced back on the telescope/camera lens at the end of the total phase.

Starting Exposure

Solar eclipses may be viewed and photographed, provided certain precautions are taken. You can photograph a solar eclipse with any type of camera: DSLR, COOLPIX or Nikon 1. The longer the focal length of the lens, the larger the images of the sun you’ll be able to make. While you can also use film cameras to photograph eclipses, this article specifically discusses digital camera use.
With a DSLR, you can also combine a super telephoto lens with a teleconverter to increase the focal length. You can also increase the relative size of the eclipse image by selecting an FX camera’s "DX Crop Mode". If you’re photographing the solar eclipse using a COOLPIX compact digital camera, turn the built-in flash to OFF.
How large you want the sun to be in the frame will determine what focal length lens to use. For a DSLR camera with a full frame FX sensor, choose a focal length of 2000mm or less. For a DSLR camera that has a DX sensor, the maximum focal length is about 1300mm; any longer and you won’t be able to get the entire sun in the frame.
However, if you also want to capture the sun’s corona during the phase of totality, then you should choose a focal length that’s shorter still—no more than 1400mm for an FX (full frame sensor) camera, or 900mm for a Nikon DX camera.
Place your camera on a sturdy tripod, and manually focus the camera, setting it to infinity.
If you are using a telescope on an equatorial mount, the electric drive will track the sun keeping it centered in your camera throughout the eclipse.

A solar filter must be used on the lens throughout the partial phases for both photography and safe viewing. These filters typically attenuate the sun’s visible and infrared energy by a factor of 100,000. Almost any ISO can be used because the sun gives off abundant light. The actual filter factor and choice of ISO will play critical roles in determining the correct exposure.
The easiest way to determine exposure is to run a calibration test on the un-eclipsed sun on a clear day prior to the eclipse. Digital cameras are ideal as you can see your results almost instantaneously. Shoot the mid-day sun at a fixed aperture, (choose an aperture between f/8 and f/16) using every shutter speed from 1/4000 second to 1/30 second. Looking at the exposures, choose the best shutter speed/aperture combination and use them to photograph the partial phases of the solar eclipse. Your camera’s histogram function is an excellent way to evaluate the best exposure. The histogram should not be clipped but should lie toward the upper end of brightness values. Because the sun’s brightness stays the same throughout the partial phases, no exposure compensation will be needed. You may also decide to bracket your exposures to ensure that you photograph the solar eclipse with a perfect exposure. If you ran your test on a sunny day and the eclipse occurs on a hazy day, increase the bracket of exposures an additional f/stop.

Photographing the Totality Phase of a Solar Eclipse

Certainly the most spectacular phase of the solar eclipse is totality. For a few brief seconds or minutes, the sun’s pearly white corona, red prominences, and chromosphere are visible.
The great challenge is to obtain a set of photographs that captures these fleeting phenomena. During the total phase, all solar filters must be removed. This is because the sun’s corona has a surface brightness a million times fainter than the sun’s visible disk or photosphere, so photographs of the corona must be made without a filter. Furthermore, it is completely safe to view the totally eclipsed sun directly with the naked eye. No filters are needed, and in fact, they would completely hide the view.
The average brightness of the corona varies inversely with the distance from the sun’s limb. The inner corona is far brighter than the outer corona thus, no single exposure can capture its full dynamic range. The best strategy is to choose one aperture and bracket the exposures over a range of shutter speeds from 1/1000 second to 1 second. You should rehearse the actions of setting up the camera and adjusting exposures because it is common for photographers to become easily distracted when viewing this phase of the solar eclipse, so much so that you forget to make pictures.
Whichever exposures you do choose, bracket by one or two f/stops to ensure you get the best possible image. Use RAW format if your camera has this option because it allows greater flexibility in adjusting the exposure when processing your images after the eclipse.



CNN / Judson Jones
If you happened to be sitting on the moon facing Earth, it would look just like the moon is casting a dark circular shadow -- called the umbra -- on the Earth. This shadow will move across the United States from west to east, but don't think about trying to keep up with it.
Unless you are flying a fighter jet, you won't be able to follow the shadow, which will be traveling at almost 3,000 miles per hour when it enters the US and then slow to nearly 1,500 mph when it traverses South Carolina.
A larger and fainter shadow called the penumbra will surround the inner shadow. This is what most people will experience -- the partial eclipse.

Precision timing

The lunar shadow first crosses the West Coast at 9:05 a.m. PDT.
People in Lincoln City, Oregon, will be the first in the continental United States to see the total solar eclipse, beginning at 10:15 a.m. PDT.
A total solar eclipse can sometimes take as long as 7½ minutes. The longest eclipse duration for this event will occur in Carbondale, Illinois, and will clock in at two minutes, 43 seconds, beginning at 1:20 p.m. CDT.

Eventually, all good things must come to an end, and the lunar shadow will depart the East Coast at 4:09 p.m. EDT.
This will be the last total solar eclipse in the United States until April 4, 2024.
It's not quite as long of a wait as you might have thought, but it won't stretch the width of the country. Instead, it will move from Mexico to Maine and then traverse New Brunswick and Newfoundland.
For another eclipse similar to this year's, one that moves from coast to coast, you will have to wait until August 12, 2045.



This is a combined article from CNN and Nikon USA.







Sunday, July 30, 2017

TECHNICAL ISSUE: UNDERSTANDING HISTOGRAMS

UNDERSTANDING HISTOGRAMS
ON YOUR DSLR CAMERAS

Once in a while, I have to get on this blog and do something technical, just to satisfy all types of
photographers.  For those of you who have a DSLR camera, you have probably noticed that one of the tools you have on your camera is the ''HISTOGRAM'' on your camera's menu.  Why would the manufacture put that in there is it wasn't there to help you out.  I looked at that on my camera when I got that too, and decided I would learn about that some day as well.  Well today is that day.  And some of you professional photographers have already learned the importance of this tool.  And are chuckling that I haven't put this in my blog sooner.  Well, "Fear not"  the time has come.  And for those of you who have a new DSLR and have wondered about it, and have not ventured into the menu this far, or have even used it, here we go, let's learn a bit about this great tool, the manufactures have put in our cameras amazing electronic system.  

First of all, by definition, what is a HISTOGRAM?   
A histogram is a graphical representation of the distribution of numerical data. It is an estimate of the probability distribution of a continuous variable (quantitative variable) and was first introduced by Karl Pearson.
(From Wikipedia)
So, now in photography terms, let's look at how we use this information.  Here is how we use Histograms:
Histograms are a very useful tool that many cameras offer their users to help them get a quick summary of the tonal range present in any given image. It graphs the tones in your image from black (on the left) to white (on the right).
The higher the graph at any given point the more pixels of that tone that are present in an image.
So a histogram with lots of dark pixels will be skewed to the left and one with lots of lighter tones will be skewed to the right.
The beauty of a histogram is that the small LCD display on your camera is not really big enough to give you an great review of a picture and you can often get home to find that you’ve over or under exposed an image. Checking the histogram can tell you this while you’re in a position to be able to adjust your settings and take another shot.
(From Darren Rowse - Digital Photography School) 


So, for us to understand how to use this in everyday life in photography, let me see if I can explain this better, and also show you some examples.  If you take a photograph, then bring up the display of the photo you just took, along with the histogram (refer to your owners manual how to do that, as every camera is different), you will see a graph of the exposure histogram.  Was it balanced between light and dark?  If it was, then you have a well exposed photograph.  Let's give you some examples:


The above shot has a lot of light tones – in fact there are parts of the shot that are quite blown out. As a result on the right hand side of the histogram you can see a sudden rise. While there are quite a few mid tones – everything is skewed right and with the extreme values on the right hand side indicate an over exposed shot.






The above shot has a lot of light tones – in fact there are parts of the shot that are quite blown out. As a result on the right hand side of the histogram you can see a sudden rise. While there are quite a few mid tones – everything is skewed right and with the extreme values on the right hand side indicate an over exposed shot.

So, now that you have seen examples of two histograms, the question can come up:  Is there a perfect histogram?  I think professionals that use histograms regularly, don't really think that there is such a thing as a perfect histogram, they all just tell you different things.  So, you do have to learn to read that a histogram tells you things that may be exactly what you want to see anyway, or it may tell you that you do need to correct it while you are there.  That is the beauty of a histogram.  I have gone taking pictures, and when I got back home, all of my photos just seemed too bright.  Rather than fixing them on my computer, if I had used the histogram, I could have fixed everything there while I was shooting.  

USING HISTOGRAMS WHILE SHOOTING:
So now you know what a histogram is – grab your digital camera’s manual and work out how to switch it on in playback mode. This will enable you to see both the picture and the histogram when reviewing shots after taking them.
Keep an eye out for histograms with dramatic spikes to the extreme ends of either side of the spectrum. This indicates that you have a lot of pixels that are either pure black or pure white. While this might be what you’re after remember that those sections of the image probably have very little detail – this is a hint that your image could be either over or under exposed.
The histogram is really just a tool to give you more information about an image and to help you get the effect that you want. Having your camera set to show you histograms during the view process will tell you how your image is exposed. Learning to read them will help you to work out whether you’re exposing a shot as you had hoped.

ANOTHER WAY IT CAN HELP:  WITH DYNAMIC RANGE:
The histogram also helps us in getting a better dynamic range in our photos. Dynamic range denotes how much of the entire range from the brightest bright to the darkest dark our camera can capture. Anything that is too bright or too dark would fall in that zone of no detail (extreme left and extreme right of the histogram).
The histogram can tell us if there is anything in the frame that falls in those areas. Like in this image.


The red bordered area shows the spike or the presence of extremely bright areas in the image. These are areas that are overexposed and are likely to have no detail. When you know that information you can take corrective measures: shoot at a different time of day or shoot in HDR mode, and so on.

HERE IS ANOTHER VERSION OF HOW TO UNDERSTAND A HISTOGRAM AS TOLD BY:  MEGHAN B OF PICTURE/CORRECT



Simply put, the histogram functions as a means of visually representing the data each pixel of an image contains. It’s a means of quantifying an image and sharing readable information. However, that explanation doesn’t fully describe the purpose or utility of the histogram. The following frequently asked questions provide answers that will better help artists understand just how the math and science behind the histogram correlates to making accurate predictions concerning the contents of an image. 

What is dynamic range?

The term dynamic range (in the context of photography) refers to the scope of being able to perceive darks and lights in a single scene. The human eye has an incredibly high dynamic range; we can see very dark shadows and bright highlights all at the same time. However, a camera has a much more limited dynamic range in comparison. The technology is limited, meaning that often times photographers are forced to choose whether they’re going to shoot to expose the brightest parts of a picture or the darkest.
over exposed image
Unfortunately, cameras don’t have the dynamic range of our eyes. In this image, the details of the apartment building are clear and properly exposed. However, clouds in the sky are completely lost.
under exposed image
In this image, the photographer adjusts the camera settings to capture the shapes and colors in the sky. Consequently, the building and tree in the foreground are shrouded in darkness.

How do you read a histogram?

Although there are no numbers or words that label the axis of the histogram, it’s a fairly straight forward graph to read and comprehend. The graph itself is a representation of an image file’s dynamic range, with pure black lying all the way to the left and pure white on the right. The peaks of a well exposed image will primarily lie in the center of the graph. The more disperse the graph, the higher the overall tonal range of an image. If you find that the histogram is tapering off to one side or the other, it signifies that information is being lost in either the highlights or the shadows of the image.
histogram with corresponding image
The histogram, depicted on the right side of the camera screen, tapers off to the right. This indicates that the image file itself is quite bright.

Why use the histogram?

Although there is no right or wrong exposure for an image, the histogram can be an incredibly helpful tool when trying to determine the exact data an image file contains. The picture on the camera itself can be an inaccurate representation of the true image file due to variable factors internally (such as a calibration issue inside of the Live View screen) or externally (a glare from the sun preventing a clear view of the picture). Therefore, it is possible to see an image that looks completely fine in camera only to realize later on that areas are over or underexposed. Luckily, since the histogram focuses on the data itself, it’s not subject to the same optical variables that prevent us from getting a clear and accurate view of our photographs.
Navigating histograms can be difficult for photographers who aren’t inclined to math or science. The quantification of a photograph often isn’t an easy concept to wrap your head around. However, taking the time to learn the ins and outs of histograms is a worthwhile endeavor for any serious photographer—it could make all  the difference in perfecting your imagery in the field to be the best it can be.




I HOPE THIS HAS HELPED YOU UNDERSTAND THIS TOOL YOU HAVE IN YOUR CAMERA, AND I HOPE YOU USE IT.  IT CAN MEAN THE DIFFERENCE, WHILE YOU SHOOT OF WHETHER YOU HAVE TO CORRECT IT THERE, ON SITE, OR BACK AT THE COMPUTER.  IT MAY BE A LOT EASIER, WHILE YOU ARE JUST THERE, TAKING THE PHOTOGRAPHS.




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Wednesday, July 26, 2017

PHOTOS OF THE WEEK: 07/27/2017: THE JOY OF ANIMALS

PHOTOS OF THE WEEK:  07/27/2017: 
THE JOY OF ANIMALS


IN MY QUEST FOR FINDING WEBSITES THAT HAVE PHOTOS THAT ARE WORTHY OF POSTING PHOTOS WORTHY OF BEING TITLED:  PHOTOS OF THE WEEK, I CAME ACROSS THIS ENTERTAINING WEBSITE:  https://www.facebook.com/thejoyofanimals/

NOT ONLY DOES THIS HAVE A HUGE FOLLOWING ALREADY (AS OF THIS PRINTING, IT HAD 214,354 LIKES) BUT, HAS ACQUIRED SOME INCREDIBLE PHOTOS OF ANIMALS THAT ARE JUST SO GOOD.  THESE ARE CERTAINLY WORTH PUTTING OUT FOR YOUR ENTERTAINMENT AND ALSO WORTHY OF:  '' PHOTOS OF THE WEEK"


Amazing photo of cubs playing with their mother. Looks like it would hurt - ouch!

Source: http://www.klein-hubert-photo.com/en/Klein-and-Hubert-animals-photographers-3.html





What a touching photo of giraffe with her calf.

Credit: @heiko.denker






Wonderful photo of a Araripe Manakin from northern Brazil. Only one thousand of these birds are believed to remain.

Credit: Ciro Albano






Prevost's squirrel (aka Asian Tri-Coloured Squirrel) is one of the most color squirrel species. This one is in the Putang National Reserve in Central Kalimantan (Indonesian Borneo).

Credit: triggsturner












A Baby sloth.













Cleaning time!

Photo: Michael Nichols





Photo by Richard Austin





The Victoria crowned pigeon (Goura victoria), native to the New Guinea region and named after Queen Victoria. Magnificent!










This is an Okapi that lives deep in the Democratic Republic of Congo and is related to the giraffe. They are solitary and usually only come together to breed. Amazing looking!





The Golden snub-nosed monkey lives in the mountainous forests of central and Southwest China. Amazing colors!







What a catch by this white tailed eagle!














Amazing to see mountain goats in action! Hard to believe they can climb these cliffs so adeptly. Wow!







What a beautiful Gypsy Vanner!





Did you know a baby porcupine is called a porcupette? Cute, but not cuddly!






Amazing photo! The osprey's diet consists almost exclusively of fish and it's the only raptor whose outer toe is reversible, allowing them to grasp prey with two toes in front and two behind.








Did you know sea turtles eat jellyfish? Here's an amazing photo showing just that!







Northern Pygmy Owl in Montana. Wonderful photo!






Helmeted Guinefowl from South Africa. Interesting fact: This is the bird that originally lead to the name "Turkey" (in reference to the region) of the North American bird since they look so similar.  Photo by John Vosloo.




Just hanging out!






This sloth is just hanging out in Costa Rica. They do love their trees and only leave them about once a week. Great photo!  Photo by Roie Galitz






Moose in Acadia National Park. Biologists estimate the Maine moose population to be around 75,000 - that's the largest concentration of moose in the country next to Alaska!






ABSOLUTELY AMAZING PHOTOS OF ANIMALS.  TAKEN BY AMAZING PHOTOGRAPHERS.  THESE PHOTOS ARE ALL COMPLIMENTS OF :  THE JOY OF ANIMALS.    AND THIS IS JUST A SMALL SAMPLING OF THE PHOTOS THEY HAVE ON THEIR WEBSITE. 

I INVITE YOU TO "LIKE" THEIR PAGE, GO TO THEIR PAGE AND SEE MORE AMAZING PHOTOS OF ANIMALS.  YOU WILL BE EDUCATED ABOUT ANIMALS, AS WELL AS FALL IN LOVE WITH THEM AS WELL.  CHECK IT OUT AT:  https://www.facebook.com/thejoyofanimals/









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Sunday, July 23, 2017

UNDERSTANDING PROPERTIES OF LIGHT IN PHOTOGRAPHY


UNDERSTANDING PROPERTIES OF 
LIGHT IN PHOTOGRAPHY !

I LOVE THIS SUBJECT !  WHY?  BECAUSE IT IS THE BASIC PRINCIPLE OF PHOTOGRAPHY!  IF YOU DON'T UNDERSTAND THE BASIC PRINCIPLE OF LIGHT IN PHOTOGRAPHY, YOU CANNOT, AND WILL NOT EVER BE SUCCESSFUL IN PHOTOGRAPHY.  I LOOK AT THE REAL PROS IN PHOTOGRAPHY, THE WILDLIFE PHOTOGRAPHERS, THE SCENERY PHOTOGRAPHERS, AND THE PORTRAIT PHOTOGRAPHERS, AND I CAN TELL YOU NOW, THAT THEY HAVE, AT ONE TIME, STRUGGLED WITH GETTING THIS CONCEPT UNDERSTOOD.  ONCE THEY HAVE THAT FIGURED OUT, THE CAMERA IS JUST A TOOL FOR CREATING THE ART FORM FOR THEM.  

WHEN YOU THINK ABOUT THE DIFFERENT TYPES OF ART FORMS, IN SCULPTING, IT WOULD BE THE STONE, OR GLASS OR WOOD, THAT IS THE MAIN PROPERTY OF ART.  IN PAINTING, IT IS PROBABLY THE PAINT BRUSH, THE PAINT ITSELF, OR THE CANVAS IT IS PAINTED ON.  BUT FOR PHOTOGRAPHY IT CAN AND IS LIGHT.

SO MANY TIMES WHEN WE TAKE PHOTOS, THE NUMBER ONE THING WE MOST OFTEN THINK ABOUT IS EXPOSURE: 
BUT KEEP IN MIND, IF YOU UNDERSTAND THIS RIGHT:  THERE IS MUCH MORE TO LIGHT THAN JUST EXPOSURE.  Light has various properties that ultimately produce different effects. It is imperative that a photographer understand light so that he or she can take advantage of and control the light. In order to comprehend light, you must be familiar with its properties.

LET'S TAKE A LOOK AT SOME OF THOSE IMPORTANT ELEMENTS OF LIGHT:

1- QUANTITY -

THIS OBVIOUSLY HAS REFERENCE TO THE INTENSITY OF LIGHT.  A LOT OF LIGHT HAS A BIG PART OF HOW YOUR PHOTO CAN TURN OUT.

2- QUALITY -

THIS HAS REFERENCE TO CONTRAST WITHIN THE LIGHT ITSELF.  IT STARTS TO CREATE A MOOD WITHIN THE LIGHT ITSELF.  IF YOU ARE DOING PORTRAITS, THIS IS A VERY IMPORTANT FEATURE.


Photo by:  Raquel Salas Photography



3-  DIRECTION OF LIGHT - 

 DIRECTION OF WHERE THE LIGHT IS COMING FROM IN THE PHOTO CAN CREATE SOME OF THE MOST DRAMATIC PHOTOS CREATED.  THIS IS ESPECIALLY A BIG PLUS IN SOME OF THE MOST BEAUTIFUL SCENERY SHOTS, AS WELL AS PORTRAITURE.

Photo by:  Pamela Locke

AND THEN WHEN YOU GET OUTSIDE, THERE ARE DIFFERENT TYPES OF SUNLIGHT SITUATIONS TO WORK WITH.   LET'S GO OVER THOSE SO YOU UNDERSTAND WHAT YOU HAVE TO WORK WITH OUTSIDE:

A- DIRECT SUNLIGHT-

NOT USUALLY THE BEST OF LIGHTING.  IT IS VERY HARSH, HIGHLIGHTS ARE USUALLY NOT DETAILED, AND IT LACKS IN CONTRAST AND PLEASING COLORS.  THIS IS USUALLY IN THE MIDDLE OF THE DAY WHEN THE SUN IS STRAIGHT OVERHEAD.  DOES THAT MEAN YOU CAN'T OR SHOULD NOT TAKE PICTURES THEN?  ABSOLUTELY NOT.  THERE ARE TIMES WHEN THIS IS THE ONLY TIME YOU CAN CAPTURE MEMORIES, AND EVENTS AND EVEN SCENERY THAT IS JUST UNIQUE BECAUSE OF THE HARSH LIGHT.  YOU BE THE JUDGE.

B- DIFFUSED SUNLIGHT -

THIS IS WHEN THERE IS VERY LITTLE SHADOWS OR NO SHADOWS AT ALL, BECAUSE THE SUN HAS GONE BEHIND THE CLOUDS.  IS THIS BAD?  OH NO!  I ACTUALLY LOVE TAKING PORTRAITS AT THIS TIME OUTSIDE.  THERE IS NOT A LOT OF SHADOWS, BUT, SOMETIMES I LIKE THAT.  TRY IT OUT:
HERE IS AN EXAMPLE OF NORMAL LIGHTING OUTSIDE, VS. THE DIFFUSED LIGHTING PHOTO ON THE RIGHT.  

C- FOG OR MIST:

Fog and mist greatly reduces details and shadows and creates an enveloping type of light. It produces weaker colors. Particular care must be taken since this type of light tends to produce flare.  But, in some cases, this creates a  mood that is very pleasing and in high demand if you capture it right:
Photo by:  Pamela Locke

UNDERSTANDING THE DIFFERENT CHARACTERISTICS OF LIGHT IS VALUABLE FOR YOU TO CREATE DIFFERENT TYPES OF MOODS, MORE PROFESSIONALISM IN YOUR PORTRAITS, AND TO CREATE THE EFFECTS THAT YOU REALLY WANT.  BY LEARNING ABOUT LIGHT, STUDYING IT CAREFULLY, YOUR PHOTOGRAPHY WORK WILL THEN BECOME ENDLESS IN WHAT YOU CAN CREATE.





ABOVE ARTICLE WRITTEN BY:  Lanny Cottrell for  123Photogo




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Wednesday, July 19, 2017

PHOTOS OF THE WEEK: 07/20/2017 - PHOTOGRAPHY IS ART !

PHOTOS OF THE WEEK:
JULY 20, 2017


Taken from the Website:  Photography IS - Art

THIS WEEK'S PHOTOS OF THE WEEK ARE TRULY A DIFFERENT THEME.  PHOTOGRAPHY AS AN ART.  WHAT DO I MEAN BY THAT?  WELL, WHEN YOU GO INTO AN ART GALLERY, NOT A PHOTO GALLERY, YOU NOTICE THAT THE ARTIST TENDS TO DRAW THEIR PAINTINGS AS A STORY.  THOSE ARE THE MOST FAMOUS OF ALL PAINTINGS.  THERE ARE SOME FAMOUS PHOTOGRAPHS IN HISTORY THAT ARE THE SAME WAY.  THIS COLLECTION OF PHOTOGRAPHS ARE JUST LIKE THAT.  AND THESE WE CAN ALL LEARN FROM.  THIS COLLECTION OF PHOTOGRAPHS ALL COME FROM SOME OF THE BEST PHOTOGRAPHERS IN THE WORLD, WHO HAVE WON AWARDS FOR THEIR "STORYLINE" PHOTOS.  TAKE A LOOK AT THESE AND SEE IF YOU FIND THAT THESE ARE JUST AMAZING PHOTOS THEMSELVES.  DIFFERENT THAN WHAT YOU ARE USED TO SEEING, BUT, STILL, SUCH AMAZING TALENTS PORTAYED HERE:


"To photograph is to hold one’s breath, when all faculties converge to capture fleeting reality. It’s at that precise moment that mastering an image becomes a great physical and intellectual joy.”
- Henri Cartier-Bresson, The Minds Eye



A. Aubrey Bodine
Nickel Coffee 1941





Marc Riboud
Karlovy Vary, Czechoslovakia, 1962





Fred Astaire and Cyd Charisse in a film still from The Band Wagon (1953)





Doroteo Arango, Pancho Villa





Wing Shya




“The most difficult thing for me is a portrait. You have to try and put your camera between the skin of a person and his shirt.”
- Henri Cartier-Bresson..







Richard Tuschman/Courtesy Klompching Gallery, New York “Somewhere in Kazimierz”








Jimmy Nelson
Maori, Rauwhiri Winitana Paki, Taupo Village, North Island, New Zealand, 2011








Herman Leonard
Ella Fitzgerald, Duke Ellington, Benny Goodman, NYC, 1948.







This portrait of Joni Mitchell by Graham Nash predates the couple’s breakup at the end of 1969. “She was listening to an acetate to make sure everything was right. Even though I was living with Joni, I didn’t want her to know why I was taking the image. I’m actually shooting through one of those kitchen table chairs that have a hole in the top where you put your hand in to lift the chair.”







Alfred Eisenstaedt
Intermission at Chinese Mission School in San Francisco, 1936








Brassaï
Boulevard Montparnasse, Paris, 1931







Édouard Boubat, 1947







Ikko Narahara
Utah 1972








Albert Monier







Sheila Metzner
Ryder One 1992
Fresson print


Scope Note:
  • Photographic prints developed and printed on fiber-based paper using a four-color process invented by Theodore-Henri Fresson. The process is a laborious and tightly controlled family secret which uses pigment rather than dye, and the print is therefore unusually stable.






Marina Abramović
“Back to Simplicity”







LILLIAN BASSMAN
Mary Jane Russell, New York, Harper's Bazaar, 1950

Lillian Bassman’s work as a photographer may have never been noticed by the art world if it weren’t for a trash bag full of her negatives that were found when she was already in her 70s. Bassman got her start as an art director under the tutelage of Alexey Brodovitch at Harper’s Bazaar. Working on a spin-off of the magazine, she s...howcased the work of photographers like Richard Avedon and Robert Frank, artists who inspired her to explore the medium herself. She developed a signature style, capturing dreamy black-and-white portraits of graceful models through experiments in the darkroom—cropping, toning, bleaching, and using gauzes and tissues to manipulate images until they took on the look of mysterious fashion illustrations.

American, 1917-2012, Brooklyn, New York









Greg Lotus
"Walking the piglet" - 2013









Bernard Plossu
Los Angeles 1974







Henri Cartier-Bresson
Mexico, 1963
State of Michoacan. Patzcuaro






Dorothea Lange
“The camera is an instrument that teaches people how to see without a camera.”
Dorothea Lange








This was truly an interesting collection of photographs this week.  I hope you will take a moment and realize the impact of these photographs.  There is history behind taking these kind of photographs.  They teach us about life.  I hope we will take a moment and learn about this different type of photography and realize that:
PHOTOGRAPHY IS ART. 

For more incredible photos like this, go to:











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