Wednesday, April 26, 2017

PHOTOS OF THE WEEK: 4/27/2017 - A dead log makes the list?

PHOTOS OF THE WEEK
APRIL 27TH, 2017

THIS WEEK'S PHOTO COLLECTION IS A COLLECTION OF SOME OF THE BEST PHOTOS FROM ALL OVER THE WORLD, FROM THE BEST PHOTOGRAPHERS FROM ALL OVER THE WORLD, WHO HAVE LET ME PUT THEIR PHOTOS ON THIS WEBSITE TODAY.  PLEASE ENJOY THIS ART AND TAKE A MOMENT TO SEE IF YOU CAN LEARN FROM THEIR GREAT ART WORK AS WELL:

Photo by the Educational Group:  Many Wonders

This photo captures the essence of color, and getting it at the right time of day.  And I just find it interesting that there are places like this in the world.  The colors, the beauty.  But, if you go there, be prepared to find out that it is a barren desert, with a harsh climate that is hard to enjoy.  But, God made a piece of beauty out there.  One person who has been there enlightens us with this information:
Vermilion Cliffs National Monument is located in Arizona, immediately south of the Utah state line. This National Monument, 293,689 acres (118,852 ha) in area, protects the Paria Plateau, Vermilion Cliffs, Coyote Buttes, and Paria Canyon.
For more information about this area, go to:





Photo by David R. Banta

David Banta has quickly become one of my favorite photographers.  It amazes me that David can just take some old moldy (not really....lichen, I believe) log in the forest, just laying there, and make
it look so beautiful.  Now, when I have learned a lot about this photo a lot, because I was into some woods the other day, with a lot of dead logs, and was trying to figure a way to make them look good, but, studying this log, the way he took this photo, made me realize there is beauty in almost everything.  Of course, it has to be the right log, correct.  A great job David.  Thanks for your
amazing talent.
© David R Banta Photography
For more information about David R. Banta Photography, go to his website at:'
Or:






Photo by Duarte Sol

Another one of my favorite photographers.  You know you come across a few favorite photographers who just does everything right.  Their composition is great, they wait for the light to become perfect, and they know where to go for the most beautiful photos.  Of Course, Duarte Sol lives in one of the most beautiful places in the world, so all he has to do is take a little trek somewhere to get these kind of beautiful photos.  Great leading lines, rule of thirds, beautiful sunset ( or sunrise ), and perfect exposure in the foreground, and you have the perfect photo.  Thanks Duarte, for your amazing talents.
For more information about Duarte Sol, go to:
Or




Photo by Jim Miller

Jim Miller is also one of my favorite photographers.  It has been a good week when some of my favorite photographers are posting some outstanding photos this week.  Jim is no exception.  He is on tour down the Rhine River.  Sometimes we don't see all the beauty of these little hidden villages unless you get a good photographer to go down the river as well, and they are willing to share their photos.  What a beautiful little village.  The homes are all beautifully painted, and the little castle or church in the background.  So unique.  Now, what makes this unique is that Jim is a good enough photographer to know how to frame this right, and make it look like a pro took it.  Great job Jim.  I have been enjoying your trip. 





Photo by: Satya Varma Chilakalapudi

Oh, this is also one of my newest favorite photographers.  He has such a unique style to his photos.  How he makes every photo look like a painting.  They are just amazing.  Plus, how he even signs his photos makes it just that much more amazing.  But, this is just life, isn't it?  Seems like such a simple photo.  But, the extra work he did to create the vignette,  and the grainy effect, and the story to
the photo is just a great photo.  His photos just capture my attention a lot.  Thanks for taking the time to make every photo you display an amazing photo.
He recently had this photo published at this website:
Congratulations on this accomplishment.  Your work will be recognized all over the world.

Thanks





Photo from the Facebook Page:  Around the World and Then Some

This new Facebook page, I recently discovered, with no photographer names to it, is basically set up as an educational page.  This allows all Facebook users to see great photos from all over the world, in different places.  I appreciate when they use such magnificent photos from great, unnamed photographers.  But, this photo really caught my eye as a perfect photo.  Lighting good subject material, good catch with the birds in the background.  It is just one of those photos that would be hard to ever see again.  So, it is certainly worthy of being counted as a "Photo of the Week".





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Thanks again to all the photographers who have willingly shared their photos to the world.  All photographers have given permission to use their photos, and are copyrighted.  Permission to use these photos must be obtained by the photographer, please.








Monday, April 24, 2017

PHOTOGRAPHIC TIPS FOR WALL ART

Photographic tips for Wall Art




Somewhere along the way, you will have taken some photos that are really, really good, and now deserve to be viewed by all who come and go into your home or office.  So, what is the best way to do this? That is what we want to accomplish in this blog today.  Take a look at this article provided by PictureCorrect and see what great things that you can do with your photos today:


Almost every photographer has had the urge to mount and display his or her photos as wall art, either at home or maybe in the office at work. At one time or another—we’ve nearly all done it—we took one of our ‘best shots’, had an enlargement made, and framed it. We brought it home or to the office and hung it on display. Then something depressing happened; the picture became unsatisfying, then boring, and finally, wall clutter. What went wrong?!


Tuscan harvest” captured by PictureSocial member David Hobcote

Perhaps a favorite shot beguiled us and we overlooked a basic fact: many good photo’s are better suited to a book or a magazine. They’re simply not appropriate for hanging upon a wall. Sometimes pictures with strong contrasts and vibrant colors can look very pleasing at first, then start to grate on us after a while if displayed as wall art.

So, now we are a little sadder but what we really want is to become somewhat wiser. We realize that what we need are photo’s that can be displayed as prints and stand the test of time, right? Definitely. Prints with lasting interest! So, how do we go about successfully shooting for that specific goal? Well, there isn’t any simple sure-fire method. But there are a few basic things to keep in mind which can definitely help in making and displaying wall art prints with lasting interest.

WHAT LASTS?

If you do a bit of looking around in your local decorative art & poster galleries, and ask a few discreet questions of the sales staff as to which kinds of photos are most in demand for home decor, you’ll likely discover, as I did, the following:

  • They are usually landscapes which have a definite mood
  • They are usually foreground or middle ground scenes, not panoramic vistas
  • The colors in them are usually muted, or pastels
  • They are often shots with mist and fog in them
  • They are usually printed on a ‘luster’ (not glossy) print surface
You can readily see that most of these factors will usually add up to a ‘painterly’ looking print. They will provide subtle pastel colors. Since such pictures already have a proven track record as successful (i.e., enduring!) wall art, why not use the above info as a set of guidelines for shooting wall art photos of lasting appeal?
If you want to display some of your photos as prints on an office wall, here’s the scoop on ‘commercial & business area’ photo decor that wears well:
  • They are mostly close-ups of flowers, leaves, ferns, etc., with dew or rain drops on them…
  • Or else, they are frequently natural abstract or pattern shots.
“Cold Blue Ice” captured by PictureSocial member Evar Guomundsson

These pictures often feature strong color and a near-graphic look


  • These kinds of prints are best made on glossy or semi-glossy print materials
  • These type of prints yield brighter colors and stronger contrast for a bolder look. Here too, you may want to make use of marketing info as practical guidelines for your own wall display shooting.

    FIND IT:

    Rather than leaving things to chance, plan your lasting decor landscapes and close-ups. First of all, search out some local places that are unspoiled and natural, with few signs of human presence or activity. Check out your nearby parks, conservation areas, or wildlife refuges.

    SCOPE IT:


    Scout these prospective locations, looking for areas and things with appealing color, pools and ponds for reflections, running water for abstractions, etc. When you find something of interest move around it in a circle and note the various possible compositions. Be especially aware of those compositions that call for either a north- or south-facing camera position. (They’ll provide maximum side-light for modelling and texture, and polarizing for saturated color.) And while you’re at it, note whether the east and west sides of such subjects are open to admit either direct early morning or late afternoon sunlight for the warm, glowing light at these times.

    A number of photo apps provide information as to when and where on the horizon the sun will rise or set in your area. Same for the full moon. Taking note of these things as well as what’s around you while scouting will help you foresee good photo opportunities well in advance.

    CHECK IT:

    Check the local weather maps for what’s upcoming in your area. Do it frequently. Remember, bad weather is good photo weather, especially during the clearing-up hours after a storm; it’s great for injecting mood into your images! By the way, online weather sources will also give you precise local sunrise and sunset times.
    Twilight on the Jetty”captured by PictureSocial member Beth

    For close-ups with dew, just keep in mind that a hot sultry day that ends with a cool and clearing evening usually guarantees heavy dew conditions the next morning.

    GO FOR IT:


    Start out well before sunrise and get on location early. Set up and shoot at first light, early light, etc. If you’re shooting a landscape that includes sky, be alert for clear strips of sky at the horizon with clouds immediately above them. This situation will often yield terrific cloud effects! Alternatively, start out well before sunset and be on-site to shoot through sundown and twilight. At either time it may be possible to shoot both landscapes and close-ups if circumstances allow.

    TOOLS AND TIPS:

    By all means take your tripod. Also a cable release, perhaps a polarizer, or a neutral density grad filter. Use either a low ISO setting or else slow speed transparency film. And, perhaps most important of all, take along a resolve to go back to your favorite spots again and again. And again! When you know a place like the back of your hand, and you’re frequently there, you’ll be surprised at the photo ‘breaks’ that come your way!
    Your personal ‘seeing’ and camera skills will undoubtedly improve as you persist at shooting both frequently and regularly. You should have no difficulty acquiring a considerable number of shots well suited for wall art.

    MOUNTING AND DISPLAY:

    Once you have on hand some images you feel will keep their appeal as wall decor in the long term, select one or two and make a 5 x 7 or a 8 x 10 print of it and tack it up somewhere that you’ll see it frequently. Give it a couple of weeks and see how well it keeps its appeal. If it passes the test then get a larger display print made, tastefully mounted and display it appropriately.
    To assist you in these regards, why not turn to one of the many reliable guides available on the subject such as, for example:
    • Kodak Publication no. 0-22, Cat. 104 8479, PHOTO DECOR – A Guide to the Enjoyment of Photographic Art.
    • A Guide to the Enhancement & Presentation of Photographs, by Otha C. Spencer (Prentice-Hall, NJ 07632)
    Such publications will provide numerous fine visual examples, as well as explanation of useful guidelines, tips, and techniques, and also offer helpful advice on many related topics such as print location, fading, lighting, etc.



    “Flamborough Dusk” captured by PictureSocial member Tony Taffinder


    The presentation info in such publications, together with the above shooting guidelines, will put you well on your way toward appropriate, enduring, wall art with long-term appeal, instead of disappointing and depressing wall clutter.

    About the Author: John Maxymuik authored this article for those photographers who want large prints of their work for display, either in a residential or business setting, but they want the results to have enduring appeal, instead of soon turning into disappointing wall clutter. To see examples of photography suitable for wall display go to his fine art photography website at ambienceimages dot net.

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    how to display art in your home infographic
    This last article about "HOW TO DISPLAY ART IN YOUR HOME" is courtesy of PictureCorrect. 

    Thanks to PictureCorrect for the great articles they allow me to share with my friends.

    123PhotoGo
    Entertainment & learning for the photographer




    123Photogo is a registered trademark.



    Sunday, April 23, 2017

    HOW TO TAKE GREAT LANDSCAPE PHOTOS

    PHOTO OF THE WEEK:

    This photo takes into consideration the rule of thirds, but, most importantly, what you have to do to get great landscape photos is patience, waiting for the perfect light.  Notice the hues in the sky.  It is not just a pretty sunset, but, a scene with mood in it.  Very unique and worthy of the Photo of the week.
    _________________________________________________________________________________

    And now to talk about this weeks subject: How to take great Landscape photos.  Now, sometimes I know people will think that landscape photos just come by naturally, and you don't need any special training on this.  I think if you have ever seen a photographic exhibit where the photographer took nothing but landscape photos, you would be in awe.  How do you get landscape photos like that?  Well, hopefully with this weeks blog, we can help you understand how to capture some amazing photos.  I will admit that doing this subject will cause you to be entertained with really incredible photography, which is a great thing.
    Point #1:  Don't be lazy.  Don't just get out of the car and shoot from the road.  Get out and move around and see what is the better shot.  Some people that have been to that location before will be in awe when they see that it is more beautiful from another angle.

    Point #2:  There are golden hours to take pictures.  About one hour after sunrise, and one hour before sunset.  Those two hours will give you the warmth and color that make the pictures just glow.  It makes them just that much better.

    Point #3:  If  you can, use a tripod. This will make your pictures sharper and clearer.  Especially if you ever decide to enlarge them.
    Point #4:  If it is hard to show someone the impact of the scenery, then include something of size that you know, like a person.  That way, you can get a feel for what kind of scope the scenery has.
    Point #5:  Don't be afraid to shoot in bad weather.  It can produce some spectacular pictures.  But, make sure you do protect your camera equipment.
    Point #6:  Take pictures of animals in their own habitat, not the zoo.  See how much more spectacular this is.  The animals in their natural habitat is a bit tricky, but, it takes practice, but, stay your distance from the dangerous animals.  Get big lenses for your camera if possible.
    Point #7:  If you can get different lenses, or can get your camera to do different angles, then do it.  Wide angle lenses for wide scenery shots makes all the difference sometimes.
     Point #8:  Add different layers.  Add something in the foreground, as well as the background.  Adds a story to your picture.
    Point #9:  Watch for false meter readings.  Whether in snow, clouds, or beaches, your meter in your camera has a hard time seeing white, and will interpret that as gray.  Be able to over expose your camera so that the snow, or clouds come out white instead of gray.  Especially in winter, we see so many winter scenes where the snow is gray or blue instead of white.  That is because your meter in your camera thinks everything in the scene is gray. It is calibrated to do so.  So, it takes practice to know how to get that right, and as we get closer to winter, we will spend some time, with a special course on how to make your snow pictures with white snow.

    Point #10:  And the last one.  Watch for leading lines, if you have them.  Your eyes follow these lines, and they make for great composition.  Even in landscape photography.  If you got them, then use them.  It will make spectacular photography. 

    _______________________________________________________________________________

    No photographers names were posted on these photos collected off the internet.  But, if the photographer who took these photos will claim the photo, I will be glad to give them credit.




    Wednesday, April 19, 2017

    PHOTOS OF THE WEEK: PHOTO CONTEST WINNERS

    PHOTO CONTEST WINNERS FOR 2016


    THIS WEEK'S PHOTOS OF THE WEEK, ARE TRUE WINNERS, AS THEY ARE POSTED WINNERS FROM THE NATURE CONSERVANCY  PHOTO CONTEST.  THESE ARE SOME OF THE MOST AMAZING PHOTOS OF NATURE YOU WILL EVER FIND.  AND OF COURSE, BECAUSE THEY ARE WINNING PHOTOS, WE WILL POST THEM HERE TO BE SHARED WITH YOU AS WELL.  ENJOY THESE AMAZING PHOTOS:

    Grand Prize

    Christmas morning on the Merced, Yosemite National Park. © Leah Horstman

    "I was having a tough time this past Xmas as my daughter and son-in-law had recently been recommishioned to Japan. Alone at the holidays, I headed to Yosemite on a last minute whim. With no available accommodations, I decided a tent would be ok, and got everything set-up in camp just as a strong storm rolled in. Over a foot of fresh snow fell that cold Xmas eve. I woke before dawn, still fully dressed and very cold. It was still dark out, but I could see the stars and the gleam of new snow. I headed a short distance down the road and pulled off at the bend in the Merced. Setting-up my tripod just as the first signs of light began to fill the valley, this was my Christmas morning scene. For me, this is more than just a captured moment, it is the moment my heart felt healed and full."

    Camera details: Canon 5D Mark III / Canon 16-35mm f/4 / Lee filter system f/20 15 sec ISO 100




    Runner-up

    Dancing at the Edge - In north Florida © Jennifer Adler
    "Nature means freedom; it gives us the ability to fly. The air-clear water emanating from the region's freshwater springs is a welcome break from the oppressive summer heat, as well as an invitation to soar in the treetops. Late one Sunday afternoon on my friend’s birthday, we drove out to Ichetucknee Springs State Park (Fort White, FL, USA) for a celebratory swim. We arrived at the end of the day when most people were just leaving the park and ended up being the only 2 people in Blue Hole, a 40-foot deep spring a quarter mile walk into the woods. The 70-degree water felt icy cold as compared to the 100+ degree heat, but it was incredibly refreshing. Leaving the above-water world behind, I dove deep into the spring, looking up to see this view that truly encapsulates my feelings when underwater."
     
    Camera details:  Nikon D800, f/8, 1/160 sec, ISO 1000



    Second Runner-up

    Dandelion dew drops © Lea Foster

    "This is a dandelion at seed stage with water droplets all over it. I photographed it one evening as it was a very light misting rain--no sun at all. I laid flat on the ground on my right side--the green in the photo is from back ground foliage as I photographed this dandelion in one of my perennial gardens. I normally photograph the insects in my gardens but in the Indiana Spring season not much is out yet---so I was a bit bored and looking for something to photograph when I thought about the dandelions. I was amazed at how the droplets just clung to the dandelion---who would have thought!"



    People & Nature

    Taking in the starry night sky © Luke Mattson

    "I decided to do a sunset hike up to Heather Lake near Mt. Pilchuck and stay the night. It was a beautiful 75 degree evening, which is rare for the month of May in Washington. When I reached the lake after sunset, I found the perfect spot on the water to set up camp and take in the starry night sky. Nearby was a large boulder in the shallows I was able to climb onto by following stepping stones from the shore. After setting my shutter on a timer, I hopped across the stones, scrambled up the rock, turned on my head lamp, looked up at the stars, and let my camera do the rest of the work."



    People's Choice & Young Photographer

    Loveable harbor seal © Ashley Tubbs

    "This image was captured at the Barnegat Lighthouse jetty in New Jersey. Though I had seen several harbor seals swimming around earlier in the day, I was ecstatic to see this chubby little guy sitting on the rocks! I sat on a rock far enough away to not bother him, but close enough to where he was interested in what I was doing. I sat with him for at least 30 minutes taking photo after photo, really enjoying my time with him! Even though he looks like he is holding his belly and laughing at something funny I just told him, he was actually just doing a big stretch. I eventually left him to finish sunning himself on the rocks and enjoy the rest of his day!"

    Camera details: Canon 7dii with the canon 400mm f5.6 lens. Shutter speed 1/640 and ISO 250.



    Mobile

    Storm over the Great Salt Lake, Utah © Michael Christoff

    "On Mother's Day weekend a large storm rolled into Salt Lake City. All I wanted to do was to get out and find the sun. I drove west towards the Salt Flats near Wendover. I spent the day discovering the diverse landscape. Salt. Water. Clouds. Mountains. I returned to Salt Lake City during the golden hour and made a stop at the Great Salt Lake near Saltair. An amazing show of light and shadow was taking place. I took over 200 shots in that twilight hour. I settled on 'Storm at the Great Salt Lake' for its lines, light and textures along with the central focus of Antelope Island in the distance. I love John Muir and thought of this quote: 'In every walk with Nature one receives far more than he seeks.'"



    Underwater

    A Magnificent Juvenile Queen Triggerfish 15' deep, Roberta's Reef, Cozumel, Mexico © William Goodwin

    "The trigger fish family all are able to lock the enlarged first dorsal fin spine by pressing the second spine int a groove on the first spine to erect it, and that is seen here. I spotted this young Queen Trigger fish, Balistes vetula, in the water column several meters above the bottom where it was calmly being cleaned by a posse of yellow wrasses. The location was about five meters deep at Roberta's Reef (a spot I know well having dove there from shore many times during a long stay on the island) off the coast of Cozumel, Quintana Roo, Mexico. The late afternoon sun gave a perfect light for an ambient light only image. It's an honor to have my image selected by the Nature Conservancy, an organization that for 50 years has worked hard to protect the environment of the state I love and call home, Colorado. I especially feel gratitude for the extensive work the conservancy does in protecting the oceans by using committed scientists and policy experts and wisely involving stakeholders at all levels."

    Camera details: Sony Nex 5N camera and a Sigma 60mm lens with no strobe. Settings were: f/8, 1/160 sec, ISO100, 350dpi.



    Nature in Cities

    Sunset Kayak on Seattle's Lake Union © Michael Gabbert

    "Living on a houseboat in Seattle has its advantages! As the sun dipped beneath Queen Anne Hill and the cirrus clouds lit up with the sunset, I hopped in my kayak and paddled to the center of the lake to soak it in. With a slight breeze sweeping north to south, the lake transformed itself to reflect a pattern reminiscent of wind swept dunes across its surface level.I soaked up the remaining minutes of these beautiful colors until I began paddling back home in what would become a night-veiled sky."

    Camera details: Canon EOS Rebel 3i, ISO 1600, f/5, 1/5.




    Adventure

    Breaking through the Akule school, free-diving in Kailua Bay, Big Island, Hawaii. © Bo Pardau

    "There is a large resident school of Akule (Bigeye Scad) that live in Kailua Bay on the Big Island and quite often we free-dive it for photo-ops. I went out this day in May 2016 with a local snorkel guide. The sandy bottom here is about 35 feet and model and photographer are free-diving."

    Camera details: Canon 7D Mark II with Tokina 10-17 fisheye lens, ambient light, ISO 320, f 10, 1/250 sec, 17mm in an ikelite housing.





    Wildlife

    Skimmers at Work Viera Wetlands, Viera, Florida © Dennis Govoni

    "Taken at the Viera Wetland in Viera, Florida near sunset. Viera Wetlands is a water reclamation site in Brevard County well-known for attracting birds and other wildlife. A small flock of Black Skimmers were feeding in one the the major pools during the still of the evening."




    A SINCERE THANKS TO THE NATURE CONSERVANCY FOR THE USE OF THESE PHOTOS, AND CONGRATULATIONS TO EACH OF THE PHOTOGRAPHERS.  THESE ARE ALL AMAZING PHOTOS AND DESERVE THIS SPECIAL RECOGNITION.  






    Sunday, April 16, 2017

    TIPS TO IMPROVE YOUR BLACK AND WHITE PHOTOGRAPHY


    HOW TO IMPROVE YOUR

    BLACK AND WHITE PHOTOS

    I HAVE DONE 3 SPECIAL PRESENTATIONS NOW ON "THE ART OF BLACK AND WHITE PHOTOS" .  See:  http://123photogo.blogspot.com/2017/03/the-art-of-black-and-white-photography.html

    Photo by:  Yasir Mehmood

    TO TAKE WINNING PHOTOS OF BLACK AND WHITE TAKES MORE THAN JUST SNAPPING PHOTOS AND THEN CONVERTING THEM INTO BLACK AND WHITE.  THERE IS TRULY AN ART TO TAKING GOOD BLACK AND WHITE PHOTOS.  I WANT TO RUN A SPECIAL PRESENTATION AGAIN ON THE "ART OF BLACK AND WHITE PHOTOS"  AND GIVE SOME POINTERS AS TO WHAT I AM LOOKING FOR IN DECIDING WHAT PHOTO IS A WINNING BLACK AND WHITE PHOTO.  LET ME GIVE YOU THE TIPS THAT I LOOK FOR IN A GREAT BLACK AND WHITE PHOTO:

    1-  SUBJECT MATTER
      WILL THIS PHOTO THAT YOU TAKE LOOK WITH THE ABSCENSE OF COLOR?  SOMETIMES I LOOK AT A COLLECTION OF PHOTOS AND THINK:  THAT SHOULD HAVE REMAINED IN COLOR.  IF IT LOOKS BETTER IN COLOR, THEN LEAVE IT IN COLOR.  THAT IS A DIFFICULT DECISION TO MAKE, BUT, A GOOD BLACK AND WHITE WILL LOOK BETTER IN BLACK AND WHITE THAN COLOR.  LOOK AT THE ABOVE PHOTO.  THAT IS A GREAT EXAMPLE OF GREAT USE OF BLACK AND WHITE.  WOULD IT MAKE A GOOD COLOR PHOTO?  I DON'T SEE IT.

    2-  SHAPE AND FORM:
    SOMETIMES WHEN YOU TAKE OUT COLOR, THE EYES HAVE TO RELY ON THE SHAPES AND DESIGNS TO ATTRACT YOUR ATTENTION  TO THE SUBJECT:  FORMS AND LINES CREATE AN INTRIGUING ASPECT OR COMPOSTION OF DIFFEREENT SHAPES.  COLOR THEN BECOMES NOT IMPORTANT AT ALL.

    3- PATTERN:

    Photo by tmc tmc

    PATTERNS SEEM MORE IMPORTANT IN SHOOTING IN BLACK AND WHITE THAN IN COLOR.  YOU NEED REPETITION, OR INTERESTING PATTERNS TO CREATE A GOOD PHOTO IN BLACK AND WHITE.  IT DRAWS MORE INTEREST TO THE VIEWER.  I WOULD THINK THAT IF YOU HAD SOME GOOD BLACK AND WHITE PHOTOS HANGING IN A BUILDING, YOU WOULD ALWAYS SEE SOME THAT HAD SOME PHOTOS OF PATTERN PHOTOS.

    4- TEXTURE: 
    TEXTURE IS ONE OF THE MOST CRITICAL THINGS TO A GOOD BLACK AND WHITE PHOTO BECAUSE WITHOUT IT, YOU DON'T HAVE DEPTH TO THE PHOTO, AND YOU WOULD HAVE JUST A PLAIN BORING PHOTO.  THIS ALSO ADDS THE NECESSARY CONTRAST THAT YOU NEED TO BRING THE BLACK AND WHITE SOME "PIZZAZ". 

    5- COMPOSITION:
    ALL THE RULES OF COMPOSITION SEEM TO BE MORE IMPORTANT IN BLACK AND WHITE PHOTOGRAPHY THAN IN COLOR.  REMEMBER ALL THE RULES DOWN TO THE "TEE'' WITH EVERY SHOT, BECAUSE IT WILL MEAN WHETHER IT BECOMES A WINNER OR NOT. 
    MAKE SURE YOU USE LEADING LINES, THE RULE OF THIRDS,  FRAMING THE PHOTOS IN SCENERY PHOTOS, ETC.  WATCH ALL THE RULES OF COMPOSITION TO MAKE SURE YOU GET INCREDIBLE COMPOSED PHOTOS.

    6- AVOID NOISE:
    HOW DO YOU AVOID NOISE IN A BLACK AND WHITE PHOTO?  BY NOT USING A HIGH ISO SETTING.  IF YOU ARE SHOOTING IN COLOR FIRST, BE AWARE THAT WHEN YOU CONVERT IT TO BLACK AND WHITE, YOU WILL INCREASE THE NOISE.  SO, WHAT IS THE ULTIMATE END IN MIND?  IF IT IS TO CREATE A BLACK AND WHITE PHOTO, THEN BE CAREFUL TO USE YOUR ISO SETTING AT A LOWER NUMBER, IF AT ALL POSSIBLE.  I WOULD RECOMMEND AT LEAST 200 OR LOWER.

    7- CONTRAST HAS TO BE NEAR PERFECT
    YOU HAVE TO HAVE EITHER REALLY HARSH CONTRAST OR GREAT GREY TONES.  DEPENDING ON YOUR PHOTO, MAKE SURE THE CONTRAST IS PERFECT.  SOMETIMES WHEN I WAS JUDGING BLACK AND WHITE PHOTOS, I WOULD SEE A GREAT COMPOSED PHOTO, BUT THE CONSTRAST WAS NOT GOOD.  SOMETIMES WHAT TURNED OUT TO BE THE MOST PERFECT CONTRAST IN GREAT BLACK AND WHITE PHOTOS WAS A GOOD PORTRAIT.  SO HARD TO GET THAT PERFECT IN BLACK AND WHITE.  I WANT TO SHOW YOU 2 PORTRAITS IN BLACK AND WHITE THAT I THOUGHT WERE BETTER IN BLACK AND WHITE THAN IN COLOR:

    Photo taken by:  Laszlo Haar



















    Photo taken by:  Gregory Giakis
     



    THE REASON THESE TWO PORTRAITS WERE 
    CHOSEN AS WINNING PHOTOS IN "THE ART OF BLACK AND WHITE" WAS BECAUSE THE CONTRAST AND THE EXPOSURE ON THEIR SKIN TONES WAS PERFECT.  THE GREY TONES, AND THE REST OF THE CONTRAST WAS, TO ME INCREDIBLE.  NOW, I COULD SHOW YOU HUNDREDS OF PORTRAITS I SAW IN THE SAME SEARHING TIME FRAME, THAT JUST LOOKED LIKE, WHAT I CALL: MUDDY GREY TONES.  AND THESE WERE JUST SO NICE.  I FELL IN LOVE WITH THESE TWO PORTRAITS BECAUSE OF THE PERFECT EXPOSURE AND PERFECT GREY TONES IN THE BLACK AND WHITE. 

    **** SUMMARY:
    MAKE SURE THE BLACKS ARE BLACK, THE WHITES ARE WHITE, AND THE GREY'S ARE GREY.  AND I WOULD SAY TO WATCH OUT FOR THE "MUDDY GREY TONES".  MAKE SURE YOU ARE LOOKING FOR PHOTOS WITH THE CONTRAST THAT LOOK LIKE THESE ABOVE PHOTOS.  

    I LOOK FORWARD AGAIN TO FINDING GREAT BLACK AND WHITE PHOTOS THAT WILL WIN AND BE PRESENTED IN "THE ART OF BLACK AND WHITE" IN THE NEAR FUTURE.  THOSE FACEBOOK GROUPS THAT SPECIALIZE IN THIS WILL BE HIGHLIGHTED AGAIN TO SHOW OFF THEIR TALENTS.






    Article written by:
              --  Lanny Cottrell
                      for



    Friday, April 14, 2017

    STUNNING PHOTOS FROM THE 2017 SONY WORLD PHOTOGRAPHY AWARDS

    Some of the world’s best contemporary photographs have been revealed.

    Over the last few months, photographers from across the globe submitted 105,000 entries to the 2017 Sony World Photography Awards’ “open” competition, spanning 10 different categories including “wildlife,” “portrait” and “street photography.”

    On March 28, Sony announced its 10 winners — and their work is striking.

    Each winner received a Sony α7 II with lens kit and will go on to compete for the title of 2017 Sony World Photography Awards’ Open Photographer of the Year, which will be announced on April 20.

    CATEGORY:  MOTION
    Winner: Camilo Diaz from ColombiaThe photographer captured a crucial goal-scoring moment in an underwater rugby match.


    CATEGORY:  WILDLIFE

    Winner: Alessandra Meniconzi from SwitzerlandA stunning wildlife shot of flamingos in Walvis Bay, Namibia.



    CATEGORY:  NATURE
    Winner: Hiroshi Tanita from JapanTanita caught the ice blue and white of winter.



    FINALIST
    Photo by Jelena Janković from Serbia.



    FINALIST
    Photo by Lester Koh Meng Hua from Singapore.



    CATEGORY:  PORTRAITS
    Winner: Alexander Vinogradov from Russian FederationA simple portrait of a young girl.



    CATEGORY:  STREET PHOTOGRAPHY
    Winner: Constantinos Sofikitis from GreeceA black and white shot of some creepiness on the street.



    CATEGORY:  CULTURE
    Winner: Jianguo Gong from ChinaScale is used to stunning effect to capture more than 1300 people practicing Tai-Chi in China.




    CATEGORY:  TRAVEL
    Winner: Ralph Gräf from GermanyA gorgeous yet understated color palette helped this photo win.



    FINALIST
    Photo by Zarni Myo Win from Myanmar



    FINALIST
    Photo by John Tao from Taiwan.



    FINALIST
    Photo by Hendrik Mändla from Estonia.




    FINALIST
    Photo by Jonatan Banista from Panama.




    FINALIST
    Photo by Mustafa Jindi from United Arab Emirates




    FINALIST
    Photo by Homare Hamada from Japan.



    FINALIST
    Photo by Kala Madriz from Venezuela.




    FINALIST
    Photo by Mohammad Amir Hamja from Bangladesh.




    FINALIST
    Photo by Khalid Alsabat from Saudi Arabia.




    FINALIST
    Photo by Aleš Krivec from Slovenia.





    MANY THANKS TO:  By Elyse Wanshel  FOR PUTTING THIS COLLECTION TOGETHER, AND FOR PUTTING IT TOGETHER THROUGH:
    HUFFINGTON POST




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