Monday, February 27, 2017

THE FILM PHOTOGRAPHER VS. THE DIGITAL PHOTOGRAPHER




==========
DIGITAL PHOTGRAPHY 
VS         FILM PHOTOGRAPHY








So, I have been around long enough to see film photographers go through all the great hay days, of trying to decide which film is the best for the type of photography they are going to do, to today's photography of megapixels and raw images and the new mirrorless cameras, etc.    So many changes in just a short time it seems to me.  Let me go over some of the great things I have seen:

  • I remember working in the camera store, and knowing the real purist photographer would be shooting slide film.  Now their choices:  Kodachrome, Ektachrome, and then the foreign films came in like Fujichrome, Agfachrome, and they all had their own characteristics that made them unique.  Kodachrome had the warmer hues to give the richer colors, but more well known for the lasting quality or archival quality of it's film.  The only problem was that it had about 12 good labs in the country to get it processed at.  And it took about a week to get your slides back.  Good slides or bad slides, you kept them all.  One flat price for all.  Most came in ISO of 25 or 64, and later on, Kodak came out with a 200 ISO.   I remember using Fujichrome 50 and 100 a lot because the colors seemed really neutral and still gave good rich accurate colors. 
  • Ilford Black and White films gave Kodak a good run for their money because they were made in Europe and had much better latitude in the gray tones, and just seemed to be the choice for those shooting black and white films.  ISO 32, 125 and 400 were the choices of the time then.
  • The other things I remember was how to show our customers how to load their film so that they didn't take pictures without the film NOT go through the camera.  How nice it was when someone made a camera that the counter would not work if the film was NOT going through the camera.  Can you imagine taking great photos, and then find out that the film didn't ever go through the camera.  Well, sometimes they thought that the developer did something wrong, not the camera.  I hated that part of it.  It was hard to convince the customer that they messed up.
  • Slide film came in exposure of 24 and 36 exposure rolls only.  Print film came in 12, 24. and 36 exposure. 
  • For a long time, and even today, film still claims to have better details in whites and blacks than in digital formats.  Although that seems to be improving in digital all the time.  
  • 35MM cameras were considered generally to be much heavier than they are today.
So, let's look at the digital cameras, which I have also sold now.

  • A digital camera can be made much lighter than the 35 mm cameras.
  • At 10 megapixel, you can generally make a very large print from the image.
  • Memory cards are small, and can hold a large amount of photos on them, plus, if you take a bad picture, you can erase it off of the card, and only keep the good pictures.
  • Obviously, no need to develop the pictures.  They are ready for preview on the camera.
  • Easily printed and printed much cheaper than they were off of 35 mm
  • Enlarges much easier than 35 mm film and can go much larger as well. 
  • Today's cameras have built-in filters and editing tools in them.
  • Trick photography and special effects are more easily done on digital photography.
  • Good Black and White Photos are easily done on digital cameras as well.
  • motor drives in digital cameras are much faster, because it doesn't have to pull film through.

So, which cameras are better? 

There are a group of photographers that are still saying that film is the pure form of photography, much like vinyl records are much better than cd's.  There was an argument the other day that I heard that film photographers have to take the perfect photo of the picture as it is, but, you notice that almost every professional digital photographer today, hardly ever takes a photo without changing their photo or enhancing their photo on the computer once they have taken it.  Almost all photos we see today are touched up or restored in some way in the computer before you see them.  So, where is the purity in photography anymore? 

I guess the one thing to always remember:  the greatest photographer in the last 100 years, is probably Ansel Adams, and he used FILM:






Now, the challenge is that for someone to develop a style, a name for themselves that will take themselves to prove that digital photography can become as famous as film. 




Article written by:  Lanny Cottrell






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Sunday, February 26, 2017

HOW TO DEFINE YOUR PHOTOGRAPHIC STYLE

Photo courtesy of :  dreamstime.com
SOMETIMES WE GO THROUGH PHOTOGRAPHIC WEBSITES, FACEBOOK AND TWITTER PHOTOGRAPHIC SITES AND THINK THAT THE PHOTOS THAT ARE PRESENTED SEEM A BIT "HO HUM".  OR THEY ALL SEEM GREAT AS LONG AS THEY FIX THEM IN THE COMPUTER AFTER THE FACT.  WHAT I HAVE MENTIONED BEFORE, AND I HAVE FOUND ANOTHER AUTHOR THAT I AGREE WITH IS THAT PHOTOGRAPHERS TODAY NEED TO DEVELOP A "PHOTOGRAPHIC STYLE".  TO MANY TIMES THEY ARE JUST OUT THERE SHOOTING EVERYTHING AND ANYTHING, AND WE DON'T GET GOOD AT ANYTHING AND EVERYTHING. 

I ONCE PUBLISHED AN ARTICLE WRITTEN BY:  Geordie Parkin  TITLED: HOW TO ESTABLISH YOUR PHOTOGRAPHIC STYLE.  SEE LINK: 

NOW FOR ANOTHER POINT OF VIEW ON THE SAME SUBJECT, HERE IS ANOTHER GREAT ARTICLE I FOUND FROM: 

ADRIAN STONE:

HOW TO DEFINE YOUR PHOTOGRAPHIC STYLE:

I spend a lot of my free time on the web exploring the work of professional and amateur photographers for ideas and inspiration. What I have discovered is that there is a lot of mediocrity out there and most of this is due to what I call a “lack of style.”

Now, before you get your knickers in a knot (you other photographers) I place myself firmly and squarely in that category of having a lot of mediocrity circulating out there for public consumption. This got me thinking, how can I improve on my photos? My conclusion – image style!


Surf the web today and you will find a plethora of photographers at all levels whose portfolios are nothing but a schizophrenic journey through colour, B&W, HDR, IR and God knows what else. Most of which is pure rubbish simply due to a lack of style.

At this point you are probably thinking, “What is this style thingy this nut bag is talking about?” Think of it as your signature. there are many great photographers out there who possess what are easily recognizable signatures to their photos. Adams, Beckerman, Gruen are a few for whom I can easily identify their work by looking at their photos simply because they possess a certain look uniquely their own – their signature, their style.

So why is this important? In my constant search to define myself and my photography I have laboured long and hard to figure out who, and more importantly, what is my focus in photography. You hear photographers talk about their genre with terms such as “Landscape Photographer”, “Wildlife Photographer”, “Street Photographer”, etc. I think it is important to specialize, to focus on a particular field of photography. Nevertheless, many photographers, such as myself, take a wide variety of photographs many of which are outside their chosen specialty either for fun or for necessity (such as here on Ecuador Unplugged). In the end though, I firmly believe if you specialize then at least 90 to 95% of your photography time should be focused on that area.

Specialization is important but it does not go far enough, most photographers stop at this point in terms of defining their work and leave out the most important aspect – creating a distinctive image style all their own. Sure, the images are cleaned up, the colour adjusted, and over Photoshopped etc. In the end each photo is completely different from the next leaving the viewers with little to no sense of a present or emerging style from the photographer.

“Sunset over Eastbourne Pier” captured by PictureSocial member Tony Bramham

YOUR STYLE DEFINES YOUR IMAGES

Creating an individualistic style for your work is an evolutionary process in photography. You must experiment and dabble for some time before you can truly determine how your images will look. Rarely will you be fortunate enough to stumble upon your own unique signature immediately. There are many aspects to defining your own style for your work and I have narrowed this down to three key components to help you along the way.

MEDIUM


What is your medium of choice? Is it colour, black and white, HDR, etc? Find a medium and stick to it, let it define you. There is nothing more distracting than looking at a portfolio that is all over the map, some B&W, some HDR, some IR, some colour. It tells me that the photographer does not know what he/she likes and really is either appealing to the masses or has not settled on, or cares about, their style. Similar to my specialization rule at least 95% of my focused work will be in the medium of choice, in my case B&W. Yes there are always exceptions, but do not let those exceptions overshadow the rule.

LOOK AND FEEL,   AKA  -  SIGNATURE

Probably the most difficult and time-consuming component of determining your individual style of photography and the most fun. Trial and error and countless processing experiments in what ever photo processing tool you use will help you refine the look and feel of your style. Keep in mind the mood, and subject of your genre and through a lot of fine tuning you will eventually create the processing tools necessary to give your images that unique style that will tell the viewer this is YOUR photograph. Establishing presets, and formulas will help you to pump out your styled photos faster once you have established the correct tuning of your images. Don’t be afraid to use the programs at your disposal and don’t be discouraged when most of your images do not turn out the way you envision. After all this is a marathon not a sprint, but when you get the right formula you can move on to the third element.

“Surprised Farmer” captured by PictureSocial member Thomas Jeppesen


Consistency

Ok, so you have your genera, you have your primary medium and you have refined your look and feel to the point you now have a signature style that you will apply to your images. Now the most important and perhaps the most difficult component to implement, consistency. It is tempting for anyone to continually tweak and change things, but in this case you need to let go of this. Minor adjustments and tweaks will always be part of the process as long as it does not radically alter your look and feel – otherwise you will have a completely different signature. Consistently apply your signature to your images. Think of this as “branding” from a marketing perspective – if you are continually changing your brand, brand message and brand image you will confuse and lose your customer base (whether paying customers or simply fans). This is why consistent application of your signature style is important to not only your images but your brand.

CONCLUSION

Some observations to consider in developing your signature style and a lasting portfolio. Processing software is a great boon and a horrible curse to photography. Avoid at all cost “gimmicky” tricks to your photography, while fun to play with things like selective colouring, horses jumping out of colour frames into B&W back grounds and over Photoshopped images, these really do not stand the test of time. Read what most of the great photographers of our era, and bygone eras, say regarding processing photos – if it can’t be done in less than five minutes don’t do it. Then look at their work and you will see that most are simple, without bells and whistles and flashing lights but they have a unique signature all their own.

Photo captured by PictureSocial member Trandinhkhiem
Whether you agree or not, defining your style is an important feature of your work. I look forward to taking this journey with you, and I have lots of work ahead in refining and defining my own signature style but I know it will be an exciting adventure.

About the Author: Adrian is a Canadian photography enthusiast and self fashioned street photography living in Guayaquil, Ecuador. He writes for  ecuadorunplugged dot com. Ecuador Unplugged is his homage to the sights, sounds, smells and tastes of what makes Ecuador a true paradise and his new home one click at a time.



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Wednesday, February 22, 2017

PHOTOS OF THE WEEK: FEATURING: UNKNOWN PHOTOGRAPHERS !

PHOTOS OF THE WEEK
2-23-2017

THERE ARE MANY TIMES THAT PHOTOS COME ALONG AND THEY COME UP TAGGED AS "PHOTOGRAPHER UNKNOWN"  OR "UNKNOWN PHOTOGRAPHER".  BUT THESE PHOTOS ARE ABSOLUTELY AMAZING.  SOMEWHERE THROUGH THE WORLD OF THE INTERNET, THEY PROBABLY GET POSTED, AND THEN POSTED AGAIN, AND AGAIN, BUT BY THE TIME THEY GET POSTED SO MANY TIMES, THEY MAY LOSE THE ORIGINAL AUTHOR'S NAME.  PEOPLE DON'T UNDERSTAND HOW IMPORTANT PHOTOS ARE TO THE ORIGINAL ARTIST.  THEY COULD BE ONE OF THEIR BEST PHOTOS EVER, AND THAT IS WHY THEY MAY HAVE POSTED IT ON THE INTERNET, TO BE SEEN BY MANY, AND WAS HOPING FOR A LITTLE RECOGNITION.

TODAY'S "PHOTOS OF THE WEEK" ARE JUST PHOTOS I HAVE BEEN COLLECTING THAT HAVE BEEN TAGGED AS "UNKNOWN PHOTOGRAPHERS".  NO NAME ATTACHED, BUT WORTHY OF BEING A WINNING PHOTO.

NOW IF BY CHANCE, THE ACTUAL ARTIST SEES HIS OR HER PHOTO SHOWN HERE AND THEY CAN PROVE THAT THEY TOOK THIS PHOTO, I WOULD BE SO HAPPY TO POST AGAIN THE PICTURE AND GIVE THEM CREDIT FOR TAKING THE PHOTO.  SO IF YOU HAVE SEEN ANY OF THESE PHOTOS AND KNOW WHO THE ARTIST IS, PLEASE HAVE THEM CONTACT ME.   LET'S GIVE CREDIT WHERE CREDIT IS DUE.   BUT FOR NOW, LET'S ENJOY SOME FANTASTIC PHOTOS AND GIVE THEM THE WINNING TAG AS "PHOTOS OF THE WEEK":

Unknown photographer


unknown photographer


unknown photographer


unknown photographer


One of the most famous photos of WWII, but still no one knows who took this photo


Unknown photographer


Unknown photographer


Unknown photographer


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There you have a very interesting and great collection of photos with unknown
photographers.

See you next week, as we do another series of :

THE ART OF BLACK AND WHITE PHOTOGRAPHY.

(THE BEST OF BLACK AND WHITE PHOTOGRAPHY - SPRING 2017)




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Tuesday, February 21, 2017

5 BLOG POSTS FROM MY ARCHIVES EVERY PHOTOGRAPHER SHOULD READ

5 BLOG POSTS FROM MY ARCHIVES EVERY PHOTOGRAPHER SHOULD READ:

I started doing this blog now since August 3rd, of 2015.  At first I was only doing 1 per week.  Then I started collecting some of the best photos on the internet, and introduced the "Photos of the Week" concept, and ended up doing 2 blogs a week.  Then I felt the need to fill in the gaps, and before you know it, we have evolved to 6 blogs a week. 

Today, I probably have calmed down to only 4 or 5 per week.  I keep finding new topics, new articles, and new photos to share.  I have started taking a lot of my own photos, and have started writing a lot of my own blogs, instead of using other photographers articles.  And even better, I have my own website now:  123photogo.com. 

So, if I was to look back at the many different blogs I have done, there are some that have been really popular, some that have been really meaningful to photographers.  Some that are popular because they are just cute too.  In today's blog, I want to highlight just 5 of the best, and most popular blogs I have ever done.  How many have I got to choose from?   Would you believe I have done over 350 blog posts now.  So, if I pick the top 5, they have got to be really good.  Let's take a look now:

#1-
 
HERE IS THE LINK:
http://123photogo.blogspot.com/2016/09/a-winning-photo-of-lightning-portrait.html

This is just one of the sample photos from one of my favorite:  PHOTOS OF THE WEEK.  This particular group of photos had some of the most entertaining of them all, and looking at the stats, this particular week had the second most hits of any of my posted blogs.... ever.   It was an amazing group of photos. and you should check this link out again.

#2-
Here is the Link:
http://123photogo.blogspot.com/2015/12/how-to-establish-your-photographic-style.html

"Summer In London" captured by Jirina Kantova. (Click image to see more from Jirina Kantova.)

This article titled:  "How to establish your Photographic style" was a great article written by Geordie Parkin.  It was so well written that I think Fuji Film posted this article on their own website as well.  But, it has such great information on how to establish your own style as a photographer.... how to be unique among photographers, so you are not like all the others out there.  It has great information and certainly worth reading again.

#3-

THE ART OF BLACK AND WHITE:
Here is the link to this post:



I hit a nerve with a group of photographers, because there is several groups on Facebook, Twitter, and other social media groups who have been very serious about making black and white photography a real art.  And it is true.  I had done some research, and some of my favorite photography friends on Facebook were also doing some real good black and white photos as well.  So, here is a special post on some real good photographers, who have chosen to keep this art alive and well.

Oh, and by the way, I did a part 2 of " The art of Black and White Photography" and had a similar response to that one too. 

Plan on seeing a Part 3 soon.

#4-

HOW TO DO GOOD PET PHOTOS / WILDLIFE PHOTOS:

Now, I had only been doing my blog about a month and a half, and boom, I went from having about 6 people view my first blog, to over 250 just on this one blog. Wow, was I excited!  So, I found out after that, and from other blogs after, that people love their pets.  I seemed to always have good results whenever I had posted something about pets or animals.  This was a short one and a fun one. 
Here is the link to this one:
http://123photogo.blogspot.com/2015/09/how-to-do-good-pet-photos-wildlife.html


#5-

HIGHLIGHTING PHOTOGRAPHERS:  FEATURING "FIG SAUVAGE PHOTOGRAPHY"


I have been extremely lucky to meet, online, some real incredible photographers.  I have loved their unique photography, and I reached out to them and wanted to do a kind of biographical story on their life and also showcase some of their own photography.  I did my first one with "Fig Sauvage Photography".  She is a wonderful photographer and has continued to grow in her art as a photographer.  Since this post, she has done her own gallery showings of her photos, and has had her photos published. 

I feel honored to know her.  She is a beautiful woman, and I am still looking forward to the time to meet her personally. I would love you all to take another look at her work at:

=====================================================================


NOW A NOTE TO ALL THOSE WHO HAVE READ THIS FAR:

*  if you are a professional photographer, and would like to have an article written about you and posted on this blog site, please contact me.  My email address is listed at the bottom.

*  if you have a special group, such as "black and white "  or "street photography"  or "dachsunds'' or some other group that you would like highlighted on my blogsite, please contact me.  Email is located below.

*  From this point forward, my blog site is changing to :  www.123photogo.com.   I have started my own website now.  Right now I am mostly posting my blogs, but, it will evolve into a wonderful, full featured photographic site, with photographers photos to sell, and products to buy. 

*  And a special thanks to all my loyal readers.  Some of you have become real good friends, and I look forward to closer relationships with you. 



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My email:    123photogo@gmail.com




Monday, February 20, 2017

5 THINGS I WISH I HAD KNOWN WHEN I STARTED PHOTOGRAPHY

5 THINGS I WISH I HAD KNOWN WHEN I FIRST STARTED PHOTOGRAPHY:

So, the first time I walked into a camera store, and decided I wanted to buy a camera, I wish I had done 5 things before I had purchased my first camera.   I want to share with you those things now, and even maybe help those who have even been taking pictures for a while with decisions that will help them as well:

1- DO YOUR OWN RESEARCH FIRST ON THE DIFFERENT BRANDS

I will admit there are a lot of brands out there.  Why doesn't it come down to one or two?  I guess it comes down to the same reason as why are there so many car manufactures.  Right?  Ask the same question about cars, and you will get the same answer about cameras.  The reason some people like Ford over a Toyota, or Chrysler over a Kia, is they try it out, they like it, or they have had a friend try it and they said it is the car to buy, and they trust them, and so on and so forth.  So, it is with the camera industry.  Someone tried Nikon, Canon, Pentax, Sony, Panasonic, Olympus, Leica, etc, and they were amazed at the pictures, and the way it felt, and they were sold on it.  So, if you don't take any body's opinion on it, then you must study it out for yourself.  Go to unbiased magazines (where do you find them?) and get the reports of how these cameras stack up against each other.  Learn about the different lenses  and who makes the variety of lenses for your camera, and how easily it is to get the lenses for the camera you seem to be narrowing your decision to.

2- DON'T MAKE A DECISION UNTIL YOU HOLD ONE AND TRY IT.


Try holding the different cameras you have narrowed your list down to, and pick them up, feel how it is in your hands.  Do the dials feel comfortable in your hands.  How are the placement of the dials or buttons?  Can you move the dials or buttons easily?  Do they make sense compared to other cameras? 

3- IF I BUY THIS CAMERA, HOW EASILY IS IT TO GET ACCESSORIES?


I have seen a few cameras where the accessories for the cameras were limited to the manufacture only.  3rd party accessories were very scarce.  That just opens up the prices to be very expensive.  That is like having a Rolls Royce car, and not being able to buy a part for it in your local auto parts store, but only from the Rolls Royce dealer.  The price is outrageous, but, really, really good.  If that is what you want, then there is no problem, but, you may also have to wait for parts too.

4- TRY TO DECIDE AHEAD OF TIME WHAT TYPE OF PHOTOGRAPHY YOU WANT TO DO, OR THAT INTERESTS YOU.


Decide ahead of time what type of photographer you want to be.  A scenery or landscape photographer, a wedding photographer, a portrait photographer, 
Photo courtesy of:  Oleg-ti.com


There is many different types of photography to get into that you might enjoy.  Decide what type of photography you want to do, and that will direct you to the type of lenses, the type of accessories and other equipment you will need to be looking at.  Buying a serious camera will never stop with just a basic camera body and lens.  If you are planning on getting serious, the extra equipment will need to be added sooner than later.

5- FIND A SOURCE TO LEARN FROM, TO HAVE A MENTOR, WHERE YOU CAN CONSTANTLY LEARN YOUR TRADE. 

I had a doctor who I thought was really good.  I also noticed that he was always studying and kept up to the new technologies that were coming out in the medicine field.  And it is the same in the camera industry.  Where can you go to learn all the new things out there.  Well, I will be right up front with you:  I am trying hard to provide good instruction for all types of photographers  on this blog, and on my website.  In fact, my website will expand into different subjects and even provide an email list soon in which you can subscribe to different topics.  I am looking to really expand this website to help all my fellow photographers, and I am looking to have photographers who want to add their expertise to help on this site as well. 

Good magazines are always a good source as well.  They are constantly updating tools of the trade, as well as tips on how to do certain types of photography.  You should never fail in photography with all the helpful things there are out there for you.

Aspens in Winter:  by Lanny Cottrell

So, hopefully this will help you as you decide on your camera or equipment in the future.  Don't make your camera and equipment purchases without doing some research, and I hope you don't take your friend or relative's opinion in the decision process.  You will feel better if you follow the above steps.




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The above article written by:  Lanny Cottrell







Sunday, February 19, 2017

GOING ON A PHOTO TREK? TAKE A PICTURE OF SOMETHING UNIQUE !

GOING ON A PHOTO TREK?

When you plan on going on a photo adventure, just for the fun of it, sometimes you will run into just nothing.  I will explain.  My wife and I just love to go on a photo trek or adventure together.  We both have our own cameras, we both have ideas of what we want to take pictures of, and we both hope for some fantastic photos.  Mostly we take scenery photos when we go out, and we look for the perfect shots.
Let me tell you the scenario yesterday, though.  Maybe you have run into something like this:  We are at a time of year when the scenery, in general, is quite ugly.  Grey everywhere.  Spring has not come yet, so no pretty foliage anywhere, dirty snow if any from all the left-over snow and plowed snow on the roads. Storm moving in, so no blue skies, so we had gray ground, gray skies, gray, dirty snow, gray foliage.  If I wanted to calibrate my camera to the perfect 18% gray, I would have it yesterday. 
Then we thought, maybe we could get a good sunset photo.  NOPE, clouds to far down, and the sun was not going to get through.  So, then we start looking around for something in the drive for something unique.  That brings up the next point:
TAKE A PICTURE OF SOMETHING UNIQUE !

So, we are driving along in some very, very small remote town, and finally come across this:
Photo by: Lanny Cottrell
A church, burned down in 2002, just the shell remains, and left standing in some remote town.  The church built in 1898 leaves a huge story behind.  And actually what makes it unique for us, is that because it was cloudy, and overcast, we had no shadows to deter from the full splendor of the photo.  I will probably work on this a bit on the computer and give it a blue sky, and make it more dramatic still.  So, to me, what we thought was going to be a photo shoot with nothing turned out to be a winner.  When you know you may not get the best in scenery, look for something in the small towns, or closeups:
Frost on the berries, by Lanny Cottrell
So, options are the town's unique things, or even closeup items. Look for those things when the things you wanted to do, just didn't work out, and you will make your photographic journey a success.


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Wednesday, February 15, 2017

PHOTOS OF THE WEEK FOCUSES ON: US NATIONAL MONUMENTS

NATIONAL MONUMENTS
VS. NATIONAL PARKS
This week's Photos of the Week, focuses on the US's
National Monuments.

There are National Parks in the United States, such as Yellowstone National Park, Arches National Park,
And many others.   So, what is the difference between a National Park vs.  a National Monument? 
There are a combination of reasons, but first and foremost in the United States is the legal way in which a national park and a national monument are established. National Parks are established through acts of Congress while National Monuments can be established by the President at his discretion.

I would like to put it in more easy to understand terms:  A national monument, once designated by the President of the United States, is not necessarily a park, and thus, may not have the public access that a National Park has. And a lot of times the monuments may be established to protect the area from further development and roads into the area.  Although the area may be just as beautiful as something you would see in a National Park, it may not ever have the access to it like a Park. 

So, with that understanding, let's take a look at some National Monuments that are maybe hard to get to, that are just amazingly beautiful areas, that you would not normally be able to see, because they are not easily accessible.

By U.S. Department of the Interior - 9375, CC BY-SA 2.0, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=45403453

Secretary Jewell & Director of the Bureau of Land Management Neil Kornze Joins Nevadans to Celebrate Designation of Basin and Range National Monument Designation preserves stunning landscapes, ancient rock art; protects existing ranching, military and recreation uses​




By U.S. Geological Surey - https://3dparks.wr.usgs.gov/nabr/html2/nb077.htm, Public Domain, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=54582164

This view is looking north along Utah Highway 261 toward the Bears Ears. Natural Bridges National Monument is to the left of the image.



By Bureau of Land Management - Browns Canyon National Monument, CC BY 2.0, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=41521469

The Browns Canyon National Monument in Colorado will protect a stunning section of Colorado’s upper Arkansas River Valley. Located in Chaffee County near the town of Salida, Colorado, the 21,586-acre monument features rugged granite cliffs, colorful rock outcroppings, and mountain vistas that are home to a diversity of plants and wildlife, including bighorn sheep and golden eagles. Members of Congress, local elected officials, conservation advocates, and community members have worked for more than a decade to protect the area, which hosts world-class recreational opportunities that attract visitors from around the globe for hiking, whitewater rafting, hunting and fishing. In addition to supporting this vibrant outdoor recreation economy, the designation will protect the critical watershed and honor existing water rights and uses, such as grazing and hunting. The monument will be cooperatively managed by the Department of the Interior’s Bureau of Land Management and USDA’s National Forest Service. Learn more: www.blm.gov/co/st/en/fo/rgfo/browns_canyon_national.html Photos by Bob Wick, BLM


By BLM-Photo - http://www.blm.gov/ca/pdfs/pa_pdfs/coastalmonument_pdfs/ccnm_rmp/ch2_mngment_decisions.pdf page 35, Public Domain, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=1441248

islands and rocks of California Coastal National Monument: This monument ensures the protection of all islets, reefs and rock outcroppings from the coast of California to a distance of 12 nautical miles (22 km), along the entire 840-mile (1,350 km) long California coastline.[28]



By Edward S. Curtis - REPOSITORY: Library of Congress Prints and Photographs Division Washington, D.C. 20540 USACALL NUMBER: LOT 12311 [item] [P&P]REPRODUCTION NUMBER:LC-USZC4-11256 (color film copy transparency)LC-USZ62-116676 (b&w film copy neg.)LC-USZ62-54704 (b&w film copy neg. of photogravure)No known restrictions on publication.DIGITAL ID:(color film copy transparency) cph 3g11256 http://hdl.loc.gov/loc.pnp/cph.3g11256(b&w film copy neg.) cph 3c16676 http://hdl.loc.gov/loc.pnp/cph.3c16676(b&w film copy neg. of photogravure) cph 3b02607 http://hdl.loc.gov/loc.pnp/cph.3b02607NOTES:H52434 U.S. Copyright Office.Title devised by Library staff.Curtis no. 1013.Copyright 1904 by E.S. Curtis.Forms part of: Edward S. Curtis Collection (Library of Congress).Published in: The North American Indian / Edward S. Curtis. [Seattle, Wash.] : Edward S. Curtis, 1907-30, suppl. v. 1, pl. 28., Public Domain, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=179645

E. S. Curtis (1904): Canon de Chelly – Navajo. Seven riders on horseback and dog trek against background of canyon cliffs. Located within the boundaries of the Navajo Nation, it preserves the valleys and rims of the canyons of de Chelly, del Muerto, and Monument, all of which are Navajo Tribal Trust Lands.[29]



By Averette at en.wikipedia, CC BY 3.0, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=4078969

A natural amphitheater canyon similar to formations at Bryce Canyon National Park, it stretches over 3 miles (4.8 km) and is more than 2,000 feet (610 m) deep.[40]



Public Domain, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=615805

The tower is a monolithic igneous intrusion of volcanic neck rising dramatically 1,267 feet (386 m) above the surrounding terrain. Proclaimed by Theodore Roosevelt, this was the first national monument.[3]



By Jason Hickey - originally posted to Flickr as Giant sequoia, CC BY 2.0, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=6191369

The monument includes 38 of the 39 giant sequoia groves in the Sequoia National Forest, amounting to about half of the sequoia groves currently in existence. This includes one of the ten largest giant sequoias, the Boole Tree. Its two parts are around Kings Canyon and Sequoia National Parks.[66]


Public Domain, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=21423

Preserving 1,900,000 acres (7,700 km2), the monument consists of the Grand Staircase, Utah,  the Kaiparowits Plateau, and the Canyons of the Escalante. It is notable for its paleontological finds and geology, and it was the first monument to be maintained by the Bureau of Land Management.[73]



By Zarxos at English Wikipedia, CC BY-SA 2.5, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=3516860

Located within the Tongass National Forest, Alaska, and called The Yosemite of the North for its similar geology, it also contains the Quartz Hill molybdenum deposit, possibly the largest such mineral deposit in the world. Throughout the monument is light-colored granite, about 50 to 70 million years old (Eocene Epoch to Cretaceous Period), that has been sculpted by glaciers that gouged deep U-shaped troughs.


By Lyn Topinka - CVO Photo Archive Mount St. Helens, Washington Before, During, and After 18 May 1980., Public Domain, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=3158771

Following the 1980 eruption of Mount St. Helens, this area was set aside for research, recreation, and education. The environment is left to respond naturally to the disturbance



CC BY-SA 3.0, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=63124

Utah Rainbow Arch: Rainbow Bridge is one of the world's largest natural bridges. It stands 290 feet (88 m) tall and spans 275 feet (84 m) wide; the top of the bridge is 42 feet (13 m) thick and 33 feet (10 m) wide. It was made from sandstone formed during the Triassic and the Jurassic periods.


By Larry D. Moore, CC BY-SA 3.0, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=27852042

The Waco Mammoth National Monument is a paleontological site and museum in Waco, Texas, United States where fossils of twenty-four Columbian mammoths (Mammuthus columbi) and other mammals from the Pleistocene Epoch have been uncovered. The site is the largest known concentration of a single herd of mammoths dying from the same event, which is believed to have been a flash flood. A local partnership developed around the site after the initial bone was discovered.

THIS IS JUST A SMALL SAMPLING OF SOME OF THE MANY US NATIONAL MONUMENTS THAT HAVE BEEN DESIGNATED AS MONUMENTS.  THESE ARE JUST SOME OF THE ONES THAT I FELT ARE JUST THE MOST BEAUTIFUL, ALTHOUGH THERE ARE STILL SOME I COULD ADD TO THIS PHOTOGRAPHIC LIST, FOR SURE.  SO I WOULD REFER YOU TO:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_National_Monuments_of_the_United_States
HERE YOU WILL FIND A COMPLETE LIST OF ALL THE MONUMENTS, WHERE THEY ARE LOCATED, AND WHEN THEY WERE DESIGNATED AS NATIONAL MONUMENTS.  I WOULD SAY, HOWEVER, AT LEAST THE ONES I HAVE LISTED ABOVE, HAVE THE POTENTIAL OF BEING SOME OF THE BEST, MOST PHOTOGENIC OF THE NATIONAL MONUMENTS.  SO, IF YOU ARE LOOKING FOR SOMEPLACE DIFFERENT TO TAKE PICTURES THIS YEAR, MAYBE LOOK INTO SOME OF THESE REMOTE NATIONAL MONUMENTS, INSTEAD OF THE NATIONAL PARKS FOR SOME BEAUTIFUL PHOTOGRAPHIC OPPURTUNITIES. 


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Monday, February 13, 2017

DO YOU LOVE TO TAKE PICTURES, JUST ANY TIME OF THE DAY?

SOME OF YOU ARE PROBABLY LIKE ME:  YOU JUST WANT TO TAKE PICTURES ALMOST ALL DAY LONG, BUT WORK, AND OTHER COMMITMENTS JUST GET IN THE WAY, AND THEN WHEN YOU THINK YOU HAVE A FEW MINUTES, YOU LOOK OUTSIDE AND THE WEATHER OR THE CONDITIONS ARE JUST AWFUL!  THEN YOU ARE THINKING:  "HOW CAN I EVER BE A SUCCESSFUL PHOTOGRAPHER"? 

THIS IS WHEN THE REAL GOOD PHOTOGRAPHERS DON'T GIVE UP.  THEY WILL TAKE A LOOK AT THE CONDITIONS THEY ARE IN, AND JUST MOVE FORWARD WITH WHAT THEY HAVE.  I FEEL REAL FORTUNATE RIGHT NOW BECAUSE I HAVE A WEATHERPROOF CAMERA AND NO MATTER HOW BAD IT IS OUTSIDE, I CAN GO OUTSIDE AND JUST CONTINUE TO TAKE PICTURES.  NOT ALL PEOPLE HAVE THAT LUXURY.  I WANT TO RECOMMEND THAT IF YOU ARE LIKE ME, THAT MAYBE THAT SHOULD BE IN YOUR BAG OF TOOLS.  GET A GOOD ONE, ONE THAT WAS MADE BY A CAMERA MANUFACTURE, SO THAT THE LENS IS SHARP, YOU HAVE OPTIONS ON THE MODES, AND YOU CAN PICK WHAT TYPE OF PHOTOGRAPHY YOU CAN DO WITH THAT CAMERA. 


I CURRENTLY OWN A PENTAX WEATHERPROOF CAMERA AND HAVE BEEN DELIGHTED BY IT'S RESULTS.  I AM GOING TO PUT UP A LINK FOR YOU FOR WHICH YOU CAN PURCHASE THROUGH THIS WEBSITE A CAMERA OR AT LEAST LOOK AT THEM AND SEE IF THIS IS SOMETHING YOU MIGHT WANT TO CONSIDER:
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ADAPTING TO WEATHER AND TIME OF DAY AS A PHOTOGRAPHER

By Wayne Turner:
Have you ever been in the position where your shutter finger is just itching to take some photos? You look outside and the weather is overcast and the sun is nowhere to be found. Take heart; you don’t always need the sun. Here’s why.


photo by Tuncay

I was always lead to believe that if there was no sun, then there wasn’t an opportunity for good photography. So during the winter months and overcast summer or spring days I had to find another hobby, or so I thought. That’s not true and I’ll show you why.

1.  SHOOTING OUTDOORS ON OVERCAST DAYS:

If you’ve never tried it, then go out and do it. You’ll be surprised at the photos you take. Why? Because the clouds act as one big filter resulting in a soft and even light. The harsh shadows you sometimes see in your sunny day images are just not there. There’s no glare in the subject’s eyes and it can look as if the photo has been taken by a professional.

photo by Cristian Bortes

Check that your white balance is set to cloudy if you aren’t shooting on automatic. Although you get really good photos on a cloudy day, it is more suited for smaller scenes, close-ups and portraits. Landscapes don’t do that well on cloudy days.

2. SUNNY DAYS:

Bright sunny days are not always the best time to take good photos. Too much bright light can be a bad thing so you need to know what time of day is best. When it’s sunny you’d probably find that around midday is not the best time to shoot any images. The lighting is directly from above and very harsh.
Shadows fall below the eyes in a portrait and can result in an ugly image. Unless you’re looking for very specific lighting effects for buildings and similar subjects, don’t shoot between 11am and 1pm.

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photo by Catrin Austin

Early to mid-morning and late afternoon are the best times for shooting on sunny days. Lighting is from the side, the contrast is great, and the atmosphere created by light that is more golden is amazing.

Besides shooting sunsets and sunrises, virtually any type of image will look great. A key here is to use bright shade for portraits and other people shots. It gives the same effect as a cloudy day.

3. SHOOTING INDOORS:

There is no bad time when shooting indoors, as you always have control of the light when using flash or strobes. But flash isn’t the greatest light to shoot by even if you do have total control. Using available natural light will always give you a great image. So what’s the best way? Find a place inside with a large window that allows a good amount of light to enter the room.

Place your subject in the area where most of this light falls. If you find that the opposite side of the subject is too dark, use a reflector which, can be a large piece of card, a white board, or a bed sheet draped just outside the view of the camera lens. Experiment to find the best subject placement. Sometimes the darker side of the image will make the overall image really stunning.

photo by Eric Hossinger

So, there’s always a time to take an image, and key to this is make the best possible use of available light. You may not be able to shoot the image you have in mind but you’ll still be able to create an image that’s stunning. You won’t necessarily get it right the first time; be prepared to experiment and try different placements and angles, and I can assure you that you’ll come up with something great.


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About the Author: Wayne Turner has been teaching photography for 25 years and has written three books on photography. He has produced 21 Steps to Perfect Photos; a program of learner-based training using outcomes based education.



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