Friday, August 5, 2016

INFORMATION AND PHOTO GALLERY OF RIO DE JANEIRO

WEEKEND EDITION
LET'S GET TO KNOW
RIO DE JANEIRO IN PICTURES:

2016 Summer Olympics are now on in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil.  Such an intriguing country.  Let's take a moment and learn a little bit about this country, this city, and enjoy knowing this city a little bit more:

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Maracana Stadium

The beloved futebol stadium will host the opening and closing ceremonies for the 2016 Olympic Games.

View in Rio

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Most of the beaches in the city offer spectacular views of the famous mountains.

Sugar Loaf Mountain

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Sugar Loaf Mountain watches over Rio with it's peak at 1,299 feet.

Lapa

Rio de Janeiro's ornate mosaic stairs in Lapa lead up to Santa Teresa, a charming bohemian neighborhood.

Arpoador, Ipanema

This dazzling beach boasts a picture-perfect backdrop of Rio's silhouette.

This iconic landmark is a must-see attraction in Rio. Recognized as one of the Seven Wonders of the World, this statue of Jesus Christ stands with arms outstretched to the city from above Corcovado Mountain's staggering 2,330-foot elevation.
Started in 1922 and completed in 1931, the monument — made of concrete and covered in soapstone mosaic tiles — stands 125 feet tall as a religious and cultural symbol of the Brazilian people's warm and welcoming culture. The monument rests atop Corcovado Mountain in Tijuca National Park and is the most famous attraction in Rio de Janeiro, visited by nearly 2 million people each year. Recent travelers recommend visiting on a day with clear skies since the vantage point is the best in the city.

Made famous by the well-known bossa nova song, "The Girl from Ipanema," this beach has drawn tourists since the 1960s. The 2-mile stretch of sand boasts gorgeous mountain views, beautiful Brazilians and cobalt waters. While sunbathing, you'll observe wildly entertaining games of futevolei (the Brazilian version of volleyball without hands) and smell fresh shrimp grilling nearby on skewers.


This hilly bohemian district boasts an eclectic array of art and architecture. Strolling along Santa Teresa's cobblestone streets, you'll be enchanted by sidewalk mosaics, palatial mansions and artsy galleries. Conveniently situated just southwest of Lapa, this neighborhood offers traditional Brazilian restaurants, bars and craft stores.
Travelers say the beautiful neighborhood showcases the best of what is left of colonial Rio de Janeiro, with vibrant street life and a charming atmosphere that's safe to explore at night.
One of the most famous parts of Santa Teresa, the bonde, or tram, has been closed since a tragic accident in 2011. It has been under renovation since 2012 and sections are expected to reopen before the 2016 Olympic Games, with full service being reinstated by 2017.

Jardim Botânico

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Spread out across more than 340 acres, this botanical paradise awes its visitors with more than 6,000 indigenous and exotic species of flora. This serene garden hosts everything from orchids to jasmine-mango heliconias.
The gardens were originally created in 1808 by Regent Prince D. João to acclimatize spices from other regions, and since its debut to the public in 1822, the verdant sanctuary has become a haven for locals and tourists; Albert Einstein even dropped in. The national park is also known as a premier botany and ecology research center.
Travelers relish the garden's tranquility and highly recommend the guided or self-driven thematic tours through sections of the park. The park also includes a playground, souvenir shop and the La Bicyclette restaurant.

Set apart from the bustling sights and sounds of central Rio, this remote neo-Gothic castle rests on a tucked away island in the Guanabara Bay. Completed in 1889 and once a prime location for Brazilian Custom Service, Ilha Fiscal now serves as an illuminated city gem. Inside the castle, you'll find hardwood mosaic floors, elaborate stained glass, as well as the transformed Ceremonial Room that's now used for Navy formal events.

Prainha Beach

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Prainha is known as Rio's "little" beach

Carnival
This usually happens in February, but is considered one of the best in the world.


ecole_dart_dans_le_parque_lage_rio  is one of Rio most impressive architectural features.


This hilly bohemian district boasts an eclectic array of art and architecture. Strolling along Santa Teresa's cobblestone streets, you'll be enchanted by sidewalk mosaics, palatial mansions and artsy galleries. Conveniently situated just southwest of Lapa, this neighborhood offers traditional Brazilian restaurants, bars and craft stores.

Another incredible view of "Christ the Redeemer"


Copacabana

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Cariocas and tourists alike flock to Rio's world-renowned Copacabana Beach.


Rio de Janeiro (/ˈr di ʒəˈnɛər, -d ʒə-, -də ə-/; Portuguese pronunciation: [ˈʁi.u dʒi ʒɐˈnejɾu];[2] River of January), or simply Rio,[3] is the second-most populous municipality in Brazil and the sixth-most populous in the Americas. The metropolis is anchor to the Rio de Janeiro metropolitan area, the second-most populous metropolitan area in Brazil and sixth-most populous in the Americas. Rio de Janeiro is the capital of the state of Rio de Janeiro, Brazil's third-most populous state. Part of the city has been designated as a World Heritage Site, named "Rio de Janeiro: Carioca Landscapes between the Mountain and the Sea", by UNESCO on 1 July 2012 as a Cultural Landscape.[4]
Founded in 1565 by the Portuguese, the city was initially the seat of the Captaincy of Rio de Janeiro, a domain of the Portuguese Empire. Later, in 1763, it became the capital of the State of Brazil, a state of the Portuguese Empire. In 1808, when the Portuguese Royal Court transferred itself from Portugal to Brazil, Rio de Janeiro became the chosen seat of the court of Queen Maria I of Portugal, who subsequently, in 1815, under the leadership of her son, the Prince Regent, and future King João VI of Portugal, raised Brazil to the dignity of a kingdom, within the United Kingdom of Portugal, Brazil, and Algarves. Rio stayed the capital of the pluricontinental Lusitanian monarchy until 1822, when the War of Brazilian Independence began. This is one of the few instances in history that the capital of a colonising country officially shifted to a city in one of its colonies. Rio de Janeiro subsequently served as the capital of the independent monarchy, the Empire of Brazil, until 1889, and then the capital of a republican Brazil until 1960 when the capital was transferred to Brasília.
Rio de Janeiro has the second largest municipal GDP in the country,[5] and 30th largest in the world in 2008,[6] estimated at about R$343 billion (IBGE, 2008) (nearly US$201 billion). It is headquarters to Brazilian oil, mining, and telecommunications companies, including two of the country's major corporations—Petrobras and Vale—and Latin America's largest telemedia conglomerate, Grupo Globo. The home of many universities and institutes, it is the second-largest center of research and development in Brazil, accounting for 17% of national scientific output according to 2005 data.[7]
Rio de Janeiro is one of the most visited cities in the Southern Hemisphere and is known for its natural settings, Carnival, samba, bossa nova, and balneario beaches[8] such as Barra da Tijuca, Copacabana, Ipanema, and Leblon. In addition to the beaches, some of the most famous landmarks include the giant statue of Christ the Redeemer atop Corcovado mountain, named one of the New Seven Wonders of the World; Sugarloaf Mountain with its cable car; the Sambódromo (Sambadrome), a permanent grandstand-lined parade avenue which is used during Carnival; and Maracanã Stadium, one of the world's largest football stadiums.
Rio de Janeiro will host the 2016 Summer Olympics and the 2016 Summer Paralympics—the first time a South American and Portuguese-speaking country will host these events, and the third time the Olympics will be held in a Southern Hemisphere city.[9] The Maracanã Stadium held the finals of the 1950 and 2014 FIFA World Cups, the 2013 FIFA Confederations Cup, and the XV Pan American Games.


Courtesy of Wikipedia.

Aerial View of Flamengo

By Donatas Dabravolskas - Own work, CC BY-SA 4.0, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=43052485


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