Friday, July 22, 2016

PHOTOGRAPHER CATCHES A VERY UNIQUE "WAVE RUNNER". GOTTA SEE IT !

WEEKEND SPECIAL:

INTERESTING PHOTOS, PHOTOS THAT TRULY CAPTURE OUR INTEREST. 

ISLAND IN THE SKY
Nature and landscape photographer Shane M. Kalyn celebrates the four natural elements—Air, Earth, Fire and Water—in his work, capturing images that are stunningly beautiful and serene. In this image, Kalyn brings together Earth and Water with a little ethereal mystic. Just how tiny is this island?
Island in the Sky by Shane M. Kalyn

This little island rests on Tumuch Lake in Prince George, British Columbia. The ripple on the left side of the photo comes from a fish and really gives the viewer a tiny perspective of the entire image.

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BABY ELEPHANT GETS A BATH

You may think of nature photography as portraits that capture the raw, wild beauty of our an animal counterparts. But, on occasion, a photograph surfaces which captures the human interest side as well. Such is the case when Arkom Pimsarn pulled out his Nikon D700 to capture a candid moment between a young elephant and his caretaker. The photo, which you can see below, was taken in Chiagn Mai, Thailand, presumably at one of the regions more credible elephant sanctuaries.

Near Chiang Mai, Thailand

For the technically curious, the photo was shot at ISO 320, with a focal  length of 170mm. The shutter speed was at 1/500th sec at f/2.8.

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Russian red  fox:

Wildlife and nature photographer Ivan Kislov has assembled quite an impressive portfolio over the past few years, including this gorgeous shot of a red fox that looks more like a painting than a photograph:

“Chukotka 2013”

Kislov lives in Magadan, a port town in a remote area of Russia. He shoots with a Nikon D800.

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Kouang Xi Waterfalls:



The Kuang Si waterfalls, located in Laos, are a photographer’s dream come true. Against the tree filled backdrop, the multi-tiered pools of glassy, turquoise water flowing over into one another are the kind of photo ops most of us can only dream of stumbling across. The photo below, taken by a Thai photographer, Banky Yknab, is the perfect example:



To get this wide angle, the photographer used a focal length of 20mm using his Canon 60D. A one second shutter speed was all he needed to get the subtle milky water effect using an aperture of f/32 and an ISO 100.

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Wave Runner:

It could be a scene from a disaster movie, as a family on a motorcycle flees from the oncoming deluge. It’s a phenomenon known as a tidal bore, where a wave travels up a river or other narrow waterway and explodes over the banks. This occurs every autumn at the Qiantang River in Hanzhou, China:

“High waves hitting the Qiantang River bank” captured by Xu Kangping

Tidal bores in this area can reach up to 30 feet in height and move as fast as 25 miles per hour. In the scene above, captured by photographer Xu Kangping, surprised onlookers rush to escape the downpour of muddy river water.


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Mountain Flowers at Sunrise:

Some photographers sacrifice a lot for their craft. One of them is landscape photographer Steve Schwindt, who drove to Mount St. Helens and then slept in his car so he could wake up early enough to capture the sunrise. He credits these Indian Paintbrush flowers as his main motivation:


Schwindt shot this photo using a Canon 5D Mark II and a Canon 17–40mm 4L lens. His settings were 19mm, f/9, ISO 400, 1/10 of a second for the flowers, and a 19mm, f/9, ISO 100, 1/5 of a second for the mountain. He used a total of 11 exposures—including 10 for the flowers—and then focus-stacked them to achieve the most clarity.

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Stunning double rainbow over a field of flowers:

Sometimes, a photographer is lucky enough to be in just the right place at just the right time to capture a once-in-a-lifetime shot. In that respect, professional landscape photographer Marc Adamus is extraordinarily lucky:


Adamus’s portfolio is full of striking, almost otherworldy landscapes like the one above—a perfectly framed combination of sunrise and double rainbow in the background, gnarled, lonely tree in the middle ground, and a splash of complementary-colored wildflowers in the foreground.
Adamus describes his own photographic style as:
“…one best defined by bold, dramatic imagery that stems from my love of unusual weather and getting far off the beaten path.”
As something of a nomad, Adamus travels the world in pursuit of more locations that are off the beaten path. This particular photo was taken in Columbia Hills, Washington.

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Thousands of birds greet photographer upon arrival:


It appeared to be a gloomy evening when photographer Jim Richardson’s boat arrived at Boreray, a remote island off of Scotland’s west coast. He was in for a surprise though, as thousands of birds from the island’s large Gannet colony flew out to greet him:


Gannets are large seabirds, typically found on the North Atlantic coasts of Europe and North America. Bass Rock off of Scotland’s east coast has the world’s largest Gannet colony, with more than 150,000 birds. It’s considered by naturalists to be one of the wildlife wonders of the world.
This photo was taken right as a bit of sunlight peaked through the clouds.
“Boreray is a wild, uninhabited island off the west coast of Scotland. Home to a great Gannet colony, it was a gloomy evening when my boat arrived, but just as a bit of sunlight poked through thousands of birds flew out to meet us.” — Photographer Jim Richardson

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HOPE YOU ENJOYED THIS WEEKEND'S SPECIAL OF INTERESTING PHOTOS.  SOME OF THESE ARE REAL KEEPERS !!! 

MAKE SURE YOU SHARE THIS WITH YOUR FRIENDS AND RELATIVES.  TOO GOOD TO JUST KEEP TO YOURSELF, RIGHT?






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